Window AC Unit Tripping


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Old 05-18-17, 05:22 AM
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Window AC Unit Tripping

Hello,

I have a 1 year old Haier AC unit, 5100 BTU, 4.0 amps. After running for a bit the unit trips the breaker at the end of the cord. This will happen every time a light switch is turned on OR just randomly after running for a bit. The cord and breaker at the end don't seem to be getting hot, but I can't get the AC unit to run for more than 10mins.

I live in an old apartment. Main circuit breaker was actually replaced last year when the hot water tank was changed from natural gas to electric.

Also, in the same apartment I have a 10,000 BTU AC window unit, 8.8 amps that has never tripped the cord breaker.

I also tried running this AC unit in a different apartment upstairs and same thing happens. A light switch is turned on and the AC unit trips off.

Is there hope in saving this AC unit? It is only 1 year old and would be a damn shame if I can't fix it or get it fixed for low cost.

Thank you for your help.

-Colin
 
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Old 05-18-17, 05:26 AM
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Just did a little test. Since i have no idea what outlets go to what circuit in my apartment, I unplugged the fridge and the bigger AC unit (two of the biggest amperage drawers in the apartment). I ran the Haier unit, flipped the switch in the same room and it tripped off...
 
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Old 05-18-17, 06:08 AM
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That is not a switch. It is not a breaker. It does not trip due to an overload. It is a LCDI (Leak Current Detection Interrupter) that trips due to current leakage in the A/C often due to a bad cord.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 06:09 AM
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Since the unit is tripping the internal breaker (the one built into the plug), it would appear (to me) that the internal breaker is defective. I don't know if you can buy a replacement "plug", but if not, I would buy a new plug and just cut off the current breaker/plug and install a simple plug. If you want to be extra safe, you could install a GFCI outlet where you plug the A/C into. I'm guessing that there may be the equivalent of a GFCI built into the current plug.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 06:15 AM
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Not a breaker but a device similar to a GFCI, a LCDI (Leak Current Detection Interrupter). The cord contains a molded in metal shield and that reacts to faults in the cord. Replacement cords are expensive.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 06:25 AM
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Any idea what replacement cord i should look be looking for?

I am willing to buy a replacement cord and install it. This unit cost around $130 a year ago....

I found this:

Name:  Haier AC Cord.jpg
Views: 3690
Size:  48.7 KB

https://www.repairclinic.com/PartDet...s=a16b198&mr=0
 
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Old 05-18-17, 06:31 AM
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I found the correct cord that fits my model.

https://www.repairclinic.com/PartDet...8d2132549&mr=1
 
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Old 05-18-17, 06:35 AM
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Best to buy one recommended for your unit. If that is recommended for your unit it is a good price. Of course it could be something else but you don't know till you try.
This unit cost around $130
I'd just replace the A/C so you don't end up spending the cost of a new unit or more before you fix it if you do fix it.
 
 

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