How much does it cost to replace Carrier AC Coil

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  #1  
Old 05-18-17, 06:52 PM
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How much does it cost to replace Carrier AC Coil

Carrier Central Air Conditioner Model: 38CKC030340

First, I would like to thank many people here had helped me to find the culprit of the AC water leak. The reason is the leakage of the AC Drain Pan.

The system was installed 2004 and the contractor suggested that I should replace the whole AC coil with a new pan for $1200. He said that it is hard to find a replacement pan and the labor for the replacement coil pan is $600.

So I decide to replace the AC coil with a new pan.

Question> Based on my system, is it reasonable for the price tag?

Thank you
 
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Old 05-18-17, 07:09 PM
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AC work is expensive. If you are sure that you need those pieces replaced, get a second estimate.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 08:09 PM
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Hello all,

I do need some expert advice here. First, I thought to replace the ac drain pan but one contractor told me to replace ac coil with the pan b/c the coil is already 13 years. Also he said he will install dual mode coil that it can support both R22 and R-410A. At the time, I didn't understand what he is talking about.

Then I talked to another AC company. The guy told me it is stupid to just replace coil without replacing the compressor outside. Because the new installed compressor will use R-410A and it is impossible to flush the whole system completely clean without R22. So I will end up to replace both compressor and coil again. He also mentioned that my AC system installed in 2004 will only last for 15 years, so it is time to replace both system with $3295.

The price tag is simply going up again!

Question> Can someone give me some suggestions whether the coil supports both type of refrigerants is a good choice for me?

Is that correct?

Thank you
 
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Old 05-18-17, 09:08 PM
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You have some people really trying to get in your wallet. How could he possibly know that it will fail in 15 yrs. I had a typical split unit back in VA that ran 17 yrs w/o a single issue, except a bad cap that I replaced myself for $25. The packaged unit on my old house here was original to the build, 1990. It did need a control board replacement in 2010, but it's still up there working away.

Average/expected life of a system is one thing, forecasting the future is another. It may fail next year, in 4 yrs, or 7 years. Unless the savings from a new system justifies the cost, I wouldn't do it.

Maybe I'm stupid (I didn't see your other thread) but pans can and do get repaired all the time. At least I assume so, they're just sheet metal right? Even if it's a temporary fix, or needs re-doing in 2 years, you have to weigh the costs vs a new system and the new issues that may bring with it..
 
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Old 05-18-17, 09:52 PM
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He also mentioned that my AC system installed in 2004 will only last for 15 years, so it is time to replace both system with $3295.
Yeah.... he's a fortune teller now. I'd kindly ignore this advice. When it up and dies... then replace it.

As far as fixing a pan. If you can get to it.... it can be done. Usually the coil needs to be pulled with the pan which is labor intensive.

I would not consider a dual coil. I'd replace the existing one with an equal R-22. When the compressor finally dies.... then replace the complete system.

No one has a crystal ball so any repair comes with some risks.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 09:59 PM
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Like I said, I didn't see the other thread, but the pan at the house in VA was almost completely accessible except for the area directly under the sloped coil. Even then there was the tiniest of gaps that I would imagine a piece of metal could be slipped through, then sealed and fastened in place.

Hey, I've only seen 4 systems so what do I know.
 
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Old 05-19-17, 05:30 AM
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I wouldn't put big money like that into a 13 year old system with r-22 in my area r-22 is $80 a lb. Id replace
 
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Old 05-19-17, 06:11 AM
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Dual Coil or NOT

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Hello all,

I test the leak through adding water on top of coil and water immediately leaks to the bottom of the furnace. This proves the leakage of the pan.

The first contractor suggested that I should replace the pan with the coil because we cannot find the drain pan easily. This morning, I checked the repairclinic.com and they confirm there is no part for the drip pan. So I have to replace both coil and pan.

Question> Which is a better option dual coil or simple R22 coil?
and Why?

Thank you
 
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