Air Conditioner Not Working - Noticed Condensation Leaking

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Old 06-08-18, 12:29 PM
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Air Conditioner Not Working - Noticed Condensation Leaking

I noticed this afternoon that my air conditioner is not working properly. I checked the condenser outside, and it seemed to be running fine. Unfortunately, I had no cool air from the vents (no air flow at all). I checked the filter and it looked okay. It was changed last month. I turned the unit off for an hour and just tried restarting it. It seemed like there was a small amount of air coming from the vents but barely noticeable. Not even 2 minutes later, I noticed that there was condensation leaking at the a/c drain line connection. I haven’t seen this happen before. I turned off the unit by the shutoff switch, because I was concerned about the leakage. As soon as I turned it back on, the condensate pump turned on and appeared to pump out condensation. I’m not sure what is happening and how to tell if this is a diy repair. I don’t know if I have frozen coils or possibly some other issue. I’ve posted a picture of where I saw the condensation.
 
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Old 06-08-18, 03:12 PM
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Since you have very reduced airflow coming from your vents, your evaporator coil is likely frozen, blocking the airflow through it. I would suggest that you turn your thermostat fan switch to ON (rather than AUTO), but don't turn the A/C on. Let it run this way at least overnight. This will speed up the process of melting any ice on the evaporator coil. Tomorrow, check to see if the airflow from the vents feels stronger and more normal.

When the airflow feels normal, try turning the A/C back on and see what happens. Likely, it will blow cold initially, but the airflow will likely get lower and lower until there is very little airflow. If this happens, your system is likely low on refrigerant, and you'll have to call an A/C technician to come out and find the leak and add refrigerant.
 
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Old 06-13-18, 01:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Bob14525 View Post
Since you have very reduced airflow coming from your vents, your evaporator coil is likely frozen, blocking the airflow through it. I would suggest that you turn your thermostat fan switch to ON (rather than AUTO), but don't turn the A/C on. Let it run this way at least overnight. This will speed up the process of melting any ice on the evaporator coil. Tomorrow, check to see if the airflow from the vents feels stronger and more normal.

When the airflow feels normal, try turning the A/C back on and see what happens. Likely, it will blow cold initially, but the airflow will likely get lower and lower until there is very little airflow. If this happens, your system is likely low on refrigerant, and you'll have to call an A/C technician to come out and find the leak and add refrigerant.
I forgot to post an update. You were right. The coil was frozen, and I was low on refrigerant. I needed 3 lbs according to the HVAC technician. $485 later, and it's fixed. He said that there is a leak. I asked him if it could be fixed, and he said that the unit I have is known to leak. I'm not sure if that's accurate, or he didn't have the right equipment.
 
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Old 06-13-18, 05:06 PM
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You should find the leak, before you have to pay another $485.
Indoor coils have had issues leaking.
 
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