How does this cooling system works?

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Old 02-05-19, 05:14 AM
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Question How does this cooling system works?

Hello
I need to cool an equipment, so opened up a mini fridge.

I observe that the cooling coil is not like a typical cooling system, as it have only one pipe. Therefore, no circulation of refrigerant.

I wonder how this cooling system works?

Thank you
George Bond
 
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Old 02-05-19, 05:45 AM
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Welcome to our forums!

There are two pipes in your picture.
They both go into the white pipe insulation.

What are you trying to cool?
Even though you salvaged a unit from a fridge that has a compartment that is above freezing the coil itself is meant to be at temperatures much below freezing temps.
When you expose this coil to room temperature plus whatever you are trying to cool the compressor will run extremely hot.
All cooling equipment has a very narrow range of temps it will be designed to work at.
There may be better choices of equipment to hack depending on what you are trying to do.
 
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Old 02-05-19, 06:02 AM
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Hi GregH
Thank you for the reply. I keep a PC inside a metal firesafe cabinet to daily backup of my data. Lately the backup time have increased and therefore the temperature have gone beyond operational temperature of the mainboard.

I plan to make a single hole and introduce this cooling coil inside to keep the temperature inside within range. In deed I wanted something that do not cool below dewpoint.

There is only one pipe on the cooling coil. The Aluminum pipe you see is the condensing coil. See a photo of similar cooling coil I found in internet.
Regards
George Bond

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Last edited by PJmax; 02-05-19 at 04:31 PM. Reason: labeled picture
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Old 02-05-19, 04:33 PM
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That's typically called a cold plate. They all have two line connections. Refrigerant must change pressure in order to work. I labeled your picture. The high pressure is sent in on the capillary tube which meters the liquid to the plate and the larger line is the suction. The capillary tube is the equivalent of the expansion valve in your line diagram.

Your picture show a cap tube in the lower right. Follow it.
 
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Old 02-05-19, 08:52 PM
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Hi Pete
Your explanation make perfect sense. Thank you.

So, can I say that the high pressure liquid is sprayed into the white pipe where it expands and cool the cold plate. The vacuum of compressor extracts the hot vapor and cycle continues until the thermostat cut off.

Now I wonder, does this cold plate have to be kept vertical with the U-trap for this system to work? (I need the cold plate to be kept horizontal inside my cabinet).

Regards
George Bond
 
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Old 02-06-19, 05:48 AM
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Along with the refrigerant compressor oil circulates with the refrigerant.
You need to keep the plate in exactly the same orientation that it was installed in the fridge.
If you don't eventually all the compressor oil will be stuck in the evaporator and the compressor will fail.
 
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Old 02-06-19, 06:13 AM
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Hi GregH
That is bad news for me. However, since I gone this far, I will just install the unit and leave it until it die

Thank you all for the valuable advice. I learn some new. (I did not find any material in internet on how this type of cooling system work. So guess others will benefit too.)

Regards
George Bond
 
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