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Does sealing foundation from the inside really work?

Does sealing foundation from the inside really work?

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Old 02-24-16, 05:04 PM
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Question Does sealing foundation from the inside really work?

Let me start off by saying I had a roofing business for years so I have a good grasp on how water penetration works. The thought of trying to fix a leak from the inside/underside of a roof is comical to say the least.

I understand we are not talking about a roof here and the angle of the water seeping in from a saturated ground is much different than pouring water directly down on a roof. So is it worth rolling on a water sealant from the inside before I close it in with drywall or would it be a waist of money and time?
 
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Old 02-24-16, 05:39 PM
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So is it worth rolling on a water sealant from the inside before I close it in with drywall or would it be a waist of money and time?
Do you have ANY type of water infiltration now ?
Sealing from the inside is usually a waste of time and resources since if you get water thru the wall the coating will usually peel off.
 
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Old 02-24-16, 05:56 PM
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In the 10 years I have been here, the only times I have got water was when my gutter down spouts blew off during heavy rain and one time we got so much rain it was declared a fema emergency. After stripping the walls I can see several white spots where I believe the minerals settled from water leaks as you can see in the picture.

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Old 02-24-16, 06:10 PM
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The white ares are Mother Nature's way of signalling a localized problem.

"Rolling" on anything does little good for the interior of a below grade concrete (poured, precast or block).

The only thing would apply (2 different homes) or recommend and have done is to use Thoroseal. As an engineer, I used it on dam repairs for a utility to enhance the exposed surface and provide a durable smooth surface for it to be perform and be an asset if to apply it applied properly.

The reason is that is not a mere coating, but it becomes a tough bonded surface of the existing surface and enhances the wall. You MUST mist the surface to apply a good coat that becomes part of the concrete. - It also eases the work for applying which takes some effort to mix and re-temper to increase the bonding. It is not as simple as painting on a cost of some "gloop". You also should mist it later to provide moisture as the concrete sucks the water out of the coating, creating a uniform, dense coating.

It also is a superior coating for exterior concrete before back filling and spraying something on.

Not for lazy, easy way out type of people.

Dick
 
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Old 02-25-16, 09:11 AM
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Does sealing foundation from the inside really work?
Not in my opinion. That's trying to stop the water when it's already 99% of the way in.
 
  #6  
Old 02-25-16, 10:25 AM
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I agree with the others. However, if the water is very much a one time thing due to extreme conditions then you may want to take a chance. I would be sure that the outside is well graded to make sure water flows away from the foundation. In many cases this all that is needed to avoid leaking walls. Another trick (but not considered professional) is to drill a hole at the base of the wall where the leak is and let it drain into the floor drainage aggregate. If you do this you can even chisel out a small depression to allow water to flow into the hole. I would not do this if you plan on covering the walls.
 
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Old 02-25-16, 11:44 AM
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Looks like I may be better off going with an exterior solution. The only parts the have leaked are easily accessible from the outside so I could put in a french drain if it becomes an issue. I will be going with a epoxy floor so there will be nothing to tear up if it does get wet.
 
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Old 02-25-16, 11:59 AM
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Gutters, downspout extensions and grading on the outside to keep the water away from the wall in the first place are the way to go.
 
  #9  
Old 02-27-16, 04:15 PM
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I was just about to ask the same question...With the recent huge rain storm in NJ - most of my backyard was soaking wet..... the rain was just so intense.... My sump pump was coming on every 5 sec...
My basement is not finished but it was recently painted with that special paint for basements....both the walls and the flooring/slab. I was checking the basement several times and at one point there was water infiltration through the wall.
It was strange to see.... only one small area, below the grade, about 5inch from where the gas pipe is coming in... and even then very hard to see... as if the wall was crying....just this small tiny wet spot...and water dripping slowly down the wall.... it lasted about 15 min and then stopped...as if it plugged itself.

I am here now for 2 yrs only...so not sure what it would be like with something like Floyd or Irene...
 
 

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