vapor barrier

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Old 04-11-16, 03:07 PM
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vapor barrier

I have recently bought a home in which the previous owner started to finish different sections of the basement. They framed walls up against the poured foundation with no vapor barrier between the wood studs and the concrete. I would like to finish with the insulation and drywall but I am not sure how to get a good vapor barrier without tearing down the current stud work. What could be my best option for this?
 
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Old 04-11-16, 03:10 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

First, don't do it - you don't put a vapor barrier between the outside wall and the insulation in a cold climate. Vapor barrier, if used, goes to the warm side of the room and for someone in Wisconsin, that's between the insulation and the drywall.

Second, no vapor barrier is typically used on a below ground wall as you want it to dry to the inside.

Most important, do you have everything done outside with gutters, downspout extensions and grading to keep the water away from your walls in the first place?
 
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Old 04-12-16, 06:00 PM
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Gutters, downspouts and grading is all good. I have yet to see any moisture in this area of my basement. So you are saying I could get the pink foam board and put that right against the wall in between my studs? Then put a plastic sheet before I drywall.
 
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Old 04-12-16, 06:11 PM
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IMO, poly vapor barriers are never a good idea below grade. Stickshift said it. A vapor retarder, such as kraft facing would be acceptable imo, since it will still let some moisture pass as needed. Your latex paint will be all the vapor barrier you need.
 
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Old 04-12-16, 10:10 PM
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Are you saying your studs are directly against the concrete? Untreated wood should not be in contact with the concrete.

Water is only half of the moisture problem. The other is moisture vapor which can transport moisture right through the foundation. If it encounters a vapor barrier it will allow the moisture to accumulate until it is just as moist as the soil outside. By using a vapor retarder it allows a small amount of moisture to continue through and avoid the accumulation.

I'll add a link for some reading.
Understanding Basements | Building Science Corporation

Bud
 
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Old 04-13-16, 04:06 AM
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Studs are not in contact with concrete. There is up to 1/4" gap.
 
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Old 04-13-16, 05:32 AM
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Any fiber insulation you install in those cavities will end up pressing against the concrete. You might check out Roxul.

Bud
 
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Old 04-13-16, 06:40 PM
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Thanks Bud9051, I checked out Roxul and that seems like it could be the product I need!
 
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