old brick house (no intake vents in attic)

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Old 09-28-16, 09:21 AM
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old brick house (no intake vents in attic)

Hi,
I noticed my brick house attic was not getting any airflow and was thinking about adding intake vents under my eave troughs, however, doing an inspection of my attic, I found out that the roof comes in contact with the brick wall (see attached pictures).

The previous owners had installed exhaust vents, but didn't install any intake vents to balance the attic ventilation. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to add some intake ventilation, since the brick walls stops any intake ventilation from under the eave troughs?

Thanks in advance!

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Old 09-28-16, 10:46 AM
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The wood up there doesn't look real healthy and dirty fiberglass insulation is an indication of air leakage from house to attic.

You say the walls are brick but does that include the gable end walls. Maybe a picture of the outside will help?

Bud
 
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Old 09-28-16, 12:58 PM
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Hi Bud,
yeah, the brick wall include the gable end walls(see picture). Doing some research I was thinking of maybe installing a power vent to help circulate the air?
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Old 09-28-16, 03:01 PM
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I'm not seeing a simple solution. A powered vent needs a lot of intake to match its exhaust.

The bricks we are seeing that block the soffit area almost look like they were added as they are inbetween the rafters.

Seal up the space around that vent pipe as that is definitely a source of moisture.

Is that window we see in the last picture inside the attic? I've seen windows replaced with louvered vents for your purpose.

What was installed for high venting? How much net free vent area does it provide?

Bud
 
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Old 09-28-16, 04:52 PM
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OK so where's the picture of the lower side of the roof on the outside?
I agree why would someone install a window in an attic instead of a gable vent?
The rake part of the roof does not get vented.
Why is there no location in your profile?
Looks like fungus may have taken a toll on those undersized joist, rafters and old 1 X 6's.
 
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Old 09-29-16, 08:22 PM
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There are 3 roof square top louvers, which I think provide NFA50.
I'm not sure why the window was put in the attic instead of a gable vent. Would changing the window to a gable vent be enough intake?

I went to home depot to get some advice on my situation, one of the workers there advise me to knock out the bricks inbetween the rafters. I'm not sure how easy that will be and if that might cause more damage than good.

Thanks for the advice about the vent pipe.
 
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Old 09-30-16, 05:15 AM
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There is a lot to air sealing and this link will help you find more. The beauty of air sealing is, it is relatively easy and highly rewarding.
https://www.energystar.gov/ia/partne...ide_062507.pdf

I mentioned above that those bricks don't look structural, like they were added just to block those cavities, but removing them could be a real project. Maybe something to consider when replacing the roof. If they could be removed and the air flow from the soffits established it would provide the air where it does the best job.

I went back and took another look at those bricks and it looks like they are a later addition, notice the mortar puttied over the tops of the ceiling joists. They might be removable. Certainly worth investigating.

As for the window, if converted to a vent it would definitely provide some air, but not as desirable as air directly at the eaves. Being large and not as well shielded as the soffits you would want a style that would prevent most moisture infiltration.

Bud
 
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Old 10-02-16, 03:48 PM
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Yeah, I think I'll try to remove the bricks myself. They have some good youtube videos on that. But if things get complicated, I'll start looking for a contractor or handyman to hire.

Thanks for the advice, Bud!
 
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Old 10-02-16, 06:54 PM
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Once you get the bricks removed in one place you can determine what access you will have into the soffits.

The typical baffles are a bit universal, which means they fit poorly everywhere. An alternate approach is to use rigid foam board spaced down from the roof deck with stripes of the same foam board. This link will give you a ton of images of attic baffles.
attic insulation baffles - Bing images

Here is a link detailing using the rigid. Site-Built Ventilation Baffles for Roofs | GreenBuildingAdvisor.com

Just thought it might work well to install the baffles at the same time you remove the bricks.

What is in the soffits now for vents?

Bud
 
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