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Buildling a raised concrete slab for washer and dryer

Buildling a raised concrete slab for washer and dryer

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  #1  
Old 12-01-16, 08:56 AM
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Buildling a raised concrete slab for washer and dryer

Hi. I'm new here so bear with me. I have a concrete floor in my basement, but it's incredibly uneven. I'm getting a new front-loading washer and dryer, and want to raise them a bit, so I am thinking of building a 6-inch high concrete slab.

I have read a few posts about this here about building a frame with wood then filling with concrete, but am still a bit confused about what kind of concrete to use. Should it be one kind of mixture, and then a leveling concrete on top? And is it necessary to put some kind of reinforcement (mesh) in the middle?

Also if the floor is uneven, what can I use to prevent the concrete from running out of the bottom of the wood frame on one side?

Thanks for your help!
 
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Old 12-01-16, 09:13 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

Why concrete? In other words, why something permanent? I would build something out of wood so I could potentially remove it (easily) in the future.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 10:05 AM
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I guess I was thinking concrete as a good way to make the surface level and have something very sturdy.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 10:11 AM
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Also, I should have defined "uneven" - it's higher by a few inches in the corner.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 10:32 AM
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Most any concrete mix should do fine. When concrete is poured out of a truck they don't add something different on top to get the finish - that is all accomplished with a trowel and working the aggregate down and cement up. Might want to place some bricks in the middle so you won't need as many bags of concrete.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 02:29 PM
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I would also build a platform from wood and skip the concrete. A level piece of 3/4" plywood will support quite a bit of weight.

There are adjustable legs than can handle the load if you want to make it simple, here's an example:
ClosetMaid 3-3/4 in. 8 in. Adjustable Universal Utility Cabinet Leveling Kit-12009 - The Home Depot

Even better than legs is scribing the platform sides to the floor. You need a jigsaw.
Basically you build the platform (4-1/2" high or so) and level it with shims. You then use a compass to mark the wood to the floor.
Once you remove the deck and cut along the scribe line, it fits level without any shims.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 02:30 PM
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I agree with wood rather than concrete. You would have to cut some tapered forms anyway, and the tools that you would need to lay it out and cut the forms would be the same ones that you could use to build a wood platform, sans the shoveling, mixing, and troweling. And carrying 60 or 80 pound bags of Quikrete down the stairs probably won't be much fun. Just guessing that you don't have a lot of experience in this area, and that's fine, no problem, but it would be a whole lot easier to back up and correct something with wood than it would be once the concrete is placed.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 02:56 PM
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OK I'm sold on the wood idea. I just need to figure out how to do it, ha ha.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 03:04 PM
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You'd frame it out similar to how you would a floor. Obviously you'll have to rip some of the wood to fit the slant. Not a big deal and if you cut too much it can always be shimmed.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 03:20 PM
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The easiest way is to start with the sides of the platform.
Cut your plywood to size, let's say 32 wide by 24 deep.
Secure 1 x 4's to each side, screwing down from the top, through the plywood into the 1 x 4.
Mark the wall location of the platform and set it in place. Once in place, level it.
Once it's level, you will see that one or both sides of the platform need trimming, that's where the compass and jigsaw come in.
It's no big deal if it's not perfect, you can still shim it a little like Mark said. It's just better to have a 1/8" shim than a 2".

I would also secure the platform to the wall with L brackets. The weight is no concern.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 10:18 PM
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Thanks so much for all the great advice!
 
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Old 12-03-16, 04:54 PM
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One more question about wood vs. cement, since my helper asked me. Wouldn't wood be susceptible to water damage and warping?
 
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Old 12-04-16, 04:49 AM
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Do you expect it to get wet? The 2xs that rest on the slab should be pressure treated and while you could use treated plywood, regular plywood should be fine especially if you prime/paint it. Having the plywood nailed/screwed to the framing should prevent it from warping.
 
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Old 12-04-16, 04:57 AM
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Be sure to make the frame sturdy. Your front load washer spins at 1200 to 1400 rpm. The stand must be flat and near level. Washer legs can make up for some unevenness. When you get to running washer come back and will tell how to do it. Don't bother with a level as it won't help.
Most important is there can not be any wiggle in stand. ALL 4 legs must be solid on floor.
 
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Old 12-31-16, 01:02 AM
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why do you want your washer to be 6" raised? because the floor's uneven and it wobbles? Doesn't it have adjustable legs on the bottom?

If you do wood (and no I wouldn't pour a slab for this),
just frame it like a deck. you can even go on craigslist and find free lumber etc. It should be pressure treated where it touches the floor but you can also use non treated wood and place galvanized steel studs under the bottom of it (or heavy plastic) so the moisture from the floor doesn't rot the wood.

Since it's uneven, easiest thing for you might be to frame it like a deck and then get 4x4s as legs in four corners. Use some books etc to prop it up level on all directions. Then put the 4x4s in the corners after you mark them where to cut. Then put a two screws in each 4x4 leg and then put 2 carriage bolts about as thick as a thumb though teach leg one on each side of the corner. Then put the plywood (or free craigslist wood) on top and then the washer. If it jumps around, get some angle brackets and predrill into the concrete floor with a masonry bit and screw 1 side of the angel bracket into the floor with a tapcon masonry blue screw (or shoot it with a powder actuated nail gun instead of messing with tapcons and predrilling). Then screw the other side of the plate to the 4x4 post, one bracket for each post should have it real sturdy.
 
 

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