Bench Footer

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Old 12-22-18, 09:33 PM
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Bench Footer

I am lowering the floor in my basement. I want to do some of the work myself. When it comes to pouring the concrete floor. I will be hiring a Mason to pour floor. I have a picture of my Bench Footer. I will add the picture here. I would like information from some folks out there who have more knowledge than I. I asked a structural engineer to draw the bench footer for me. For some folks who may not know what a bench footer is, a bench footer is a support footer all around the original footer in basement. It will look like a curb all around the perimeter of basement. A bench footer supports the original footer and allows the floor to be dug out lower to add more height in basement. I intend on building the forms for the bench footer. I must admit I am not sure of a few things : what thickness of plywood should I be using ? , should I not use plywood and instead use board 2 X 12's , etc. I need to form out 28 inches high from dirt toward ceiling (vertical dimension). Should I use screws or nails to connect boards at corners. Hammer in 2 X 4 pointed wood stakes into ground then screw into stakes from inside of form or nail ? What do I use to act as a release agent on wood (from cement) ? At Lowes they have 3/4 inch plywood seems a good thickness. I guess it would be easier than boards due to cement leaking through seams. What is best way to bend # 4 rebar ? I could purchase the rebar from some company have them bend it but the sizes will vary and makes things more difficult as to bending it on site.
Thank you very much.
 
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Old 12-23-18, 05:20 AM
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You can use almost any material you want for forms and keep in mind you are building to strength. The form must withstand the weight of the wet concrete. There is no requirement or specification for what you use. If you use a thicker material like 3/4" your supports can be further apart or if you can use 3/8" or 1/2" but it will require more closely spaced framing to support.

Sometimes I just drive stakes into the ground if the ground is right to accept big stakes. Other times, like when the ground is too hard for stakes, I will use soil or gravel and berm up on the outside of the form to provide support. In a basement like yours you can.

I use smooth nails to hold forms together as you may have to rip it apart from the outside. Nails will more easily pull out than nails making the disassembly job easier. For release agent I usually don't use anything but a coating of diesel or kerosene will help the form release a bit easier. Your form is relatively short and simple so I probably wouldn't bother.

Since you are going to need a fair number of rebar pieces with the same Z bend I'd check around to see if you can find someone to bend them for you. My lumber yard has a bender and will bend to shape for little or no charge.
 
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Old 12-23-18, 09:28 AM
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Pilot Dane thanks, I really appreciate the information. I have 150 linear feet of forms the basement is pretty big. The dirt is pretty hard I believe. Rebar is 16 inches on center. Possibly I could use some rocks in between the rebar to hold up the forms. I have clay soil. Uncle told me house was built on swamp and area was filled in. I will try to use wood stakes. I may have to use some steel stakes to pound in against the forms I guess.
 
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Old 12-23-18, 02:40 PM
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If you're going to be putting down a layer of crushed stone before pouring the floor you have to get the stone in there anyhow. I would get at least some of the stone in there before the pour. If you have a form start bowing out you can quickly shovel stone to shore it up before pouring deeper.
 
 

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