Skylight blackout blinds

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Old 06-06-16, 08:49 AM
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Skylight blackout blinds

I'm looking for a decent brand of skylight blinds (manual interior mount). I've seen them online ranging from $100 to $300 and they all pretty much look the same. I don't necessarily need total light blockage--I'm more interested in blocking heat from the sun while at work during the day. So if I can find a decent light filtering and insulating blind that would be ideal. I'll be doing the installation myself so I'm inclined to save a few bucks and order online, but I want to be sure I'm getting a quality blind and that isn't exactly an easy determination when shopping online. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Levolor? Velux? Bali?
 

Last edited by mossman; 06-06-16 at 09:41 AM.
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Old 06-06-16, 12:12 PM
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Of those three, they're pretty much the same as far as quality. You probably want to look at cellular, light filtering shades. Not 100% sure, but I think Velux might need a Velux window.
 
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Old 06-06-16, 02:05 PM
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I found a double cell Bali light-filtering shade I like and ordered several samples so I can select a color. They're only about $125 each, so not bad.
 
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Old 06-06-16, 06:16 PM
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Sounds good !
 
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Old 06-06-16, 06:38 PM
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Since blocking light is not your main concern, have you considered a UV protective film? 3M makes its and it's very inexpensive. It also comes in various colors and designs. You can also get a mirror reflective type film. If you go to extremes you can even consider a solar cell to fit in the space.
Just ideas to consider.
 
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Old 06-07-16, 08:23 AM
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I actually thought of that last night (UV film/window tint). I am now considering it. My main goal is to reflect heat without cutting down too much on light transfer (if that's possible). I feel like if I get light filtering shades, that I will always leave them closed, and if I get blackout shades, I'll be opening and closing them all the time, which will be a pain. I'm thinking UV film may be the way to go. I'd also like to do a small octagon window in the upstairs hall that is very leaky and takes full sun pretty much all day.
 
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Old 06-07-16, 08:48 AM
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Apparently the 3M residential film isn't sold to the general public. It looks like I'd have to get a contractor to install it, which would likely be substantially more costly than shades. I found a film available on eBay and Amazon called Blackbox Magnificent Solar Control Home Window Tint. I went ahead and ordered a couple samples. Amazon.com: Black Box Magnificent Solar Control Home Window Tint Light 20 in x 4.5 ft: Automotive
 
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Old 06-07-16, 09:01 AM
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Not to burst your bubble, but for a skylight, in a hot climate, you'd need to get a dark tint, which would give you a blackout effect. Dark films are also known to crack windows eventually. Just an FYI.
If you really want a tint, you really need a pro to install it. DIY stuff is pretty useless, IMO.

ETA: you can order a long pole to open the shade with. Not sure if it comes with the shade or not.
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 06-07-16 at 11:21 AM.
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Old 06-09-16, 11:13 AM
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Car windows get much hotter than a house window so why don't they crack? And wouldn't installing a blackout blind and having a 2" or 3" cavity between the blind and window create even more heat and potential damage to the window than a film would? You're essentially creating a small furnace in that cavity.

ETA: you can order a long pole to open the shade with. Not sure if it comes with the shade or not.
I realize this. My dilemma is I feel like I will be opening and closing the shades all the time and it will be an annoyance. I would rather have some light coming through all the time as opposed to full intensity or nothing, hence the reason I'm considering tint.
 

Last edited by mossman; 06-09-16 at 11:30 AM.
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Old 06-09-16, 11:30 AM
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Well depends on how hot it gets and how much sun is coming thru. The farther south you live, it's more of an issue. The other issue is that it's a skylight. The hot sun is shining right down at you, as opposed to a regular window.
It's something about the darker tint that cracks the window.
Guess you can try it and see if it does the trick or not.

Remote shades are also available, but will cost more.
 
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Old 06-09-16, 01:48 PM
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The roof pitch is about 45 degrees and the skylights face east-northeast so it's not all day direct sun. I got two estimates, both at $300 to $350, and that includes the octagon window on the front of the house. Not bad. One company uses 3M tint (3M silver P18 or 3M Affintiy 15) and the other uses Suntek tint (SDS20).

I would love to have remote blinds, but can't justify the cost at $500+ a pop.
 
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Old 06-09-16, 02:34 PM
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I agree with you. What kind of warranty do they offer and will they inspect and do any remedial work on the skylights (at extra cost of course) if necessary?
 
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