Identifying Rubber Tubing

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Old 02-20-19, 04:12 PM
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Identifying Rubber Tubing

I'm helping a neighbor on rebuilding a shower. We discovered black rubber tubing embedded in concrete under the old shower pan. It must be connected to his boiler for floor heat. It most closely resembles old washing machine supply hoses. Can this stuff be cut and spliced to reinstall in a new concrete bed? The new shower will only be about half the size of the old one, so the amount of tubing must be reduced if not totally eliminated.
 
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Old 02-20-19, 04:33 PM
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No, it is unacceptable. Should be removed and replaced - preferably not embedded in concrete.
 
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Old 02-20-19, 04:35 PM
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Tough question. Can you see it in an open area like near the boiler or in the basement ?
Possibly check for labeling.
Maybe post a picture of it...... How-to-insert-pictures
 
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Old 02-20-19, 06:19 PM
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Homewners back on the weekend. I'll see if I can post photos. @74 I'm electronically challenged. I know a lot of struff, just nothing about boilers and HW heating systems.
 
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Old 02-21-19, 03:32 AM
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There must be a circulating pump and control for the floor heating or does it flow 24/7? If the bathroom has another source of heat, I would eliminate the floor heating. No reason to heat the floor under the shower pan unless you want warm feet while taking a cold shower.
 
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Old 02-25-19, 08:31 AM
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Closeout

Owner returned over the weekend and I learned a little more. The tubing under the shower pan is an extension of the bathroom floor heat, with one stat controlling it all. There is no labeling on the black tubing, but it appears to be in sound condition. He knows it to be about 20 yrs old. The existing tubing will fit under the new reduced shower area, so we will just put it back in, with the reasoning that it is no more likely to fail than the tubing under the rest of the floor. Thanks all for comments.
 
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Old 02-25-19, 09:45 AM
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I am not comfortable with flexible/rubber tubing in inaccessible areas. It's probably been protected by the concrete but rubber hoses still die of old age. The belts and hoses on a car will get get brittle, crack and break even if the car is not run. I would not reuse the old hose. At the minimum I would replace the portion that will be under/in concrete so at least the new work doesn't have to be jack hammered out because of a 20 year old leaking hose.
 
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Old 02-25-19, 10:03 AM
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Thanks Dane

I am not comfortable either, but I don't know the proper splicing technique, so afraid I might create a larger problem than re-installing old tubing. If I knew how to properly splice, I would eliminate the coil under the shower and just reconnect the two stubs so that the existing loop under the floor would remain operational. Money is really tight for this person and I am working pro bono as a neighbor, while keeping in mind that no good deed goes unpunished.

Edit: These are circa 1900 houses and this work is in a 20 yr old addition that was extremely poorly done by a GC. It is virtually impossible to trace lines from the boiler to the 2nd story.
 
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Old 02-25-19, 01:10 PM
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Ah, the fun of old houses. Often there is no 100% right answer short of tearing it down and starting from scratch.
 
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Old 02-25-19, 01:39 PM
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Nice try, Dane. We are in a historic district, so the city won't let us tear them down. About a dozen yrs ago a GC was fined $7,000 for replacing original windows with look-alike modern sashes. There are some real nut jobs here.
 
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Old 02-26-19, 04:51 AM
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Hysterical districts are a totally different animal and luckily something I don't have to deal with. It takes a contractor with the right mindset and a homeowner with a much larger budget.
 
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