Gap / Settling on patio paver retaining wall

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Old 05-03-16, 02:10 PM
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Gap / Settling on patio paver retaining wall

Hello All: Had a paver wall built up around my stamped concrete patio about 4 years ago. Drainage holes were made between concrete patio and wall in various areas to allow water to exit. Where the wall bends, there was always a small space/gap between the pavers, but I have noticed over the years the spacing has gotten a little wider, with the widest point being at the top of the wall where you would sit, so pavers are shifting on an angle. Any suggestions on how this could be fixed without taking the wall apart? Tried laying heavy pavers on top to push it back down, but not sure if that would work. Is there any support I can put underneath to lift the wall to close up the gap? I do not want to have to use an epoxy or cement. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you, Stan Picture link: https://www.dropbox.com/s/zq8squqb15...46285.jpg?dl=0
 
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Old 05-03-16, 04:16 PM
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What blocks specifically are those? Are they engineered for retaining wall use? I don't see anything tying them together at least at the crack location in the curve.

Unfortunately I don't know of an easy fix. The two causes that come to mind are; improper blocks and a foundation/footer problem.
 
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Old 05-04-16, 10:36 AM
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Thanks for response Pilot. Yes, these are for retaining wall/patio usage. Were purchased at lawn and garden center. Foundation is on gravel. What do you mean by something that would tie them together? Do you mean paver glue/epoxy?
There is epoxy on the pavers on tops and bottoms, but not on the sides---do you think this would help?
 
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Old 05-04-16, 11:17 AM
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I see a basic Lego building error - there is not overlap (interlocking) of the joints so you have a crack/joint that goes almost all the way through the wall. I just don't think this was built correctly in the first place.
 
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Old 05-04-16, 12:03 PM
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I see a basic Lego building error - there is not overlap (interlocking) of the joints so you have a crack/joint that goes almost all the way through the wall. I just don't think this was built correctly in the first place.
I certainly agree with this but unfortunately it looks like the blocks used were quite narrow, actually somewhere narrower than others. Because of that getting a proper overlap would've been very difficult if not impossible.

It seems like the easiest solution may be to just move the top layer of blocks closer together (may require adding a small piece on one end or the other) so the top layer doesn't have any significant gaps and not worry about the gaps in the lower layers.
 
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Old 05-04-16, 12:25 PM
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it looks like the blocks used were quite narrow
Agreed and I believe this was another error in the building of this wall.
 
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Old 05-05-16, 05:56 AM
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I may actually try to adjust the top three layers and include single large blocks that overlap. Thanks for your assistance
 
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Old 05-05-16, 06:13 AM
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There are retaining blocks sold at major home centers that I would only consider using for garden edging. The blocks are relatively light in weight and no not have a mechanical interlock from one block to the next. Often they instruct the user to use glue to help stick the blocks together and prevent the wall from shifting.

Compare them to proper, engineered retaining wall block which are engineered to be a structure. The type I use have fiberglass pins that connect the blocks horizontally and vertically. The blocks can still move but they are mechanically fastened together. The pin system also insures that there is proper overlap from one row to the next. Add in their mass which is about 70 pounds before they are filled with stone and you have a wall that is very different than one constructed from the blocks sold by most home centers.



In your case I would not try re-stacking. To do so you would have to excavate or remove the fill used on the back side which is no small task. Then the work to shift the blocks and with the small size blocks in the problem area you might only get them to move a little bit or you completely re-stack rows which is more work. In the end you've still got the same blocks with little mass above helping to hold them together. Yes, re-stacking and getting proper overlap will help but I don't think it will be worth the labor involved as they are still likely to move as they've already done.
 
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