melted garage snow causing spalling on concrete block

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Old 05-04-16, 06:14 PM
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melted garage snow causing spalling on concrete block

Every winter, the melted snow from my car runs along the garage floor and runs into the bottom of 1 concrete block on the inside wall of the garage (right next to the garage door). This block has a lot of spalling both on the inside of the garage, and even on the outside. I would like to keep the water away from this block. Mudjacking is not an option because the garage is attached and would be too difficult or expensive. I would like to keep the water off the block by either painting it with an epoxy paint and possibly caulking a sheet of rubber to the floor and in front of the block so that the water runs away from it and out the garage door. I would like advice on whether or not this plan is a good idea, and suggestions on what kind of paint/primer to use, how to attach the sheet of rubber to the floor & block, or different alternatives I could try.
I'm leaning more toward caulking a rubber car mat to the floor. That way I can rip it off if it doesn't work. I've been seeing some stuff about painting a concrete block actually locking moisture in the block, and I definitely don't want to do that.
Much appreciated.
 

Last edited by neuromancer; 05-04-16 at 06:30 PM.
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  #2  
Old 05-05-16, 02:02 AM
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Pics would allow us to see what you see and give better advice - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

Epoxy paint isn't needed for the block. A coat of block filler as a primer followed by 1-2 coats of latex paint should do fine. If you prime/paint the block on both sides moisture in the block won't be an issue.
 
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Old 05-05-16, 07:07 PM
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Here are some photos: The first two show the low spot where the salt water runs into the wall

The third shows the spalling a little better
You can see it is even spalling on the outside of the garage from the inside out.
 
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Old 05-06-16, 06:33 AM
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Not a pro on this, but being snow melt from your vehicle you are probably also dealing with some salt. In a garage application a few years ago I cut some groves in the concrete to provide drainage under the door to the outside. Their problem was ponding from being too level, but the same approach for you could move most of that water outside before it has a chance to soak in. Probably a combination of repair/paint/and drain would be best. BTW, concrete cuts very easily with modern diamond blades, like butter.

Bud
 
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Old 05-07-16, 07:50 PM
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I definitely have ponding and the garage floor has almost no pitch at all. For the grooves, should I cut 1 groove 4feet long by a half inch wide by a half inch deep or would you recommend something else? I'm assuming you cut a v shape or do you just go the width of the diamond blade straight down? For repairing the concrete blocks, do you just scrub the block with a brush and then spread on some hydraulic cement or something else?
 
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Old 05-08-16, 03:39 AM
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every time my bride drives into the garage from rain OR the a/c's been on in the car, water drips off & runs downhill towards the drywall & base molding,,, i keep meaning to build a curb & drill a drain hole thru the floor,,, thanks for the reminder - good job for today

will cost MUCH less than mudjacking the garage floor too
 
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Old 05-08-16, 04:58 AM
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For rlat work like that I would use my skill saw set to 1/2 or 3/4" deep. The cut is straight down and about 1/8" wide so takes several passes. You can either make a few extra passes to clean out the bottom by wobbling side to side or use a cold chisel to clean it up.

I'm not a concrete repair guy, but last I did I used some liquid to coat the surface before troweling on a new surface. I'm sure others here have best advice.

Bud
 
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Old 05-09-16, 07:19 PM
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I'm also considering rubber flooring for the whole garage. Costs around $500 and looks dead easy to install.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKYtdA0X28c
 
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