Pouring Concrete

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-24-16, 06:11 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Usa
Posts: 32
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Pouring Concrete

Name:  image.jpg
Views: 659
Size:  39.6 KB

This is a test to attach pic. Next step is to pour concrete. This, I will not do myself. The builder that put the pole barn up will be pouring and finishing the concrete. I'm not sure concrete is his forte but he seems to have all the right answers when I ask him questions. My big fear is the timing of the finish and allowing all bleed water to escape especially with vapor barrier. Is this hard to judge or if he has decent experience he will know? I know a silly question to put out there but just trying to determine if this is a routine task in the concrete process. Also, temperature is hot mid 90's but it will be under cover so no direct sun. There are two large garage doors 12' wide with 3 man doors and 7 windows for air flow. Any concerns pouring in these conditions?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-27-16, 10:25 AM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5,325
Received 112 Votes on 104 Posts
Deercamp, I separated this post from your previous one in the plumbing form. I figure you'll get more help here in the concrete forum.

(Plumbing-related thread for the same structure for anyone who's interested: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pl...rete-slab.html)
 
  #3  
Old 07-27-16, 07:48 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
A common mistake by inexperienced finishers is to start working the surface before the bleed water has completely evaporated. The result will weaken the surface, making it prone to dusting and more serious deterioration because of excessive water-cement ratios at the wearing surface.

The conditions you're describing are not good for a number of reasons. Mainly, hot concrete wants to flash-set, making it hard to strike-off and finish. Without adding more water to the surface, which brings us back to the nasty excessively high water-cement ratio thing. Ideally, the mud coming down the chute should be at or below 80-degrees F. Some ready-mix plants will add ice to the mix water, which can be effective in keeping the mud cool enough to avoid flash-set.

If there's no real need to rush the operation, do yourself a favor, and hold off on pouring until cooler temperatures prevail.
 
  #4  
Old 08-01-16, 06:40 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Usa
Posts: 32
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks...

We're getting close to the pour date and just wanted to run this past you guys...

He's actually planning to pour in two pours, back-to-back days. The high temps for the two days are forecasted to be 84 and 88, not the mid 90s I was thinking. Is this still too warm. Again, it's under cover, so no direct sun. I might be able to push him back a week to get to temps of 75 and 77, but not sure how import ten degrees is. Thanks for any feedback...
 
  #5  
Old 08-01-16, 09:24 AM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Temps in the mid-80s would be considerably better than the mid-90s. If it was my money paying for it, I'd call the ready-mix supplier and ask what measures they use to keep the mixes in their transport trucks from getting too hot--paying an extra two or three bucks a yard for DOT-compliant mix would be well worth it.

And don't forget the air entrainment.
 
  #6  
Old 08-01-16, 10:21 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Usa
Posts: 32
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
They will add a "set retarder" if requested. As far as the Air Entrainment, I was not considering this because of the application of the building...

1. totally under roof with no exposure to water
2. used as hunting camp so any water will be during fall
3. vapor barrier under so freeze/thaw should water free

I was more concerned with bleed water escaping and avoiding delamination. Please let me know what you think. What should I be more concerned with delam or freeze/thaw?

Another piece of info. The guy doing the work is not a "concrete" guy. He's more of a builder, however, does concrete. I've seen some of his work but know it's not his forte.
 
  #7  
Old 08-02-16, 06:32 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Usa
Posts: 32
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Name:  image.jpg
Views: 291
Size:  26.4 KB

I'm posting from phone so this may be a duplicate post, sorry...

Okay, I given this some more thought. I have attached my plans. You'll see the building is basically split in half. Because of this and size, the guy is planning two pours. My questions...

1. Because I'm planning to polish and use concrete as finished floor in living and workshop spaces, should I go with no air entrained concrete? Again, my concern is getting all bleed water out and getting nice finish.
2. Because garage will get heavier use and be more likely to see water freeze, go with air entrained in that area?
3. Because entire building is under roof and no use during winter months, go with no air entrained concrete for entire building?
4. No dummy, you're over thinking the whole thing. Air entrain the entire slab and you'll be fine.

Thanks for any and all feedback.
 
  #8  
Old 08-02-16, 06:13 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
You're confusing me with contradictory comments of "getting no water/more likely to see water freeze." My suggestion to use air was based on what I saw in the photo--an uninsulated pole barn with no visible source of heat, located in a climate zone that can see very cold temperatures and lots of freeze/thaw conditions. Should you choose to go with no air because of factors I'm not aware of, so be it. I don't ever recall seeing pole barns used for living quarters, or even being heated. Must cost a fortune to keep it warm during a cold winter. Guess I need to get out more often.

I get the impression you're not quite comfortable with your builder's concrete finishing abilities. Have you looked at any concrete pours he's done? Does he float finish with a rotating paddle? Have you asked him how he makes his 'bleed water gone?' determination?
 
  #9  
Old 08-03-16, 07:42 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Usa
Posts: 32
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Okay let me try to clarify. Yes, pole barn will be finished off as living space and garage. Building will be fully insulated, however, will be used as a seasonable building. In other words, it will not be used in the winter and will not be heated so will experience freeze conditions. There will be no external exposure. The only source of water will be isolated to the garage caused by equipment moving in and out during wet or snowy conditions. Yes, we get snot in October and November.

- Yes, I've seen his work, but I'm doing my homework.
- Yes, he'll float it by hand and finish with power trowel
 
  #10  
Old 08-03-16, 07:45 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Usa
Posts: 32
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Another clarifying point...

It will have a heat source for early spring and late fall months, but when I shut it down in winter, there will be no heat.
 
  #11  
Old 08-03-16, 10:58 AM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Based on the updated info, I don't believe air entrainment would be necessary. That's assuming things don't change, and lots of road salt isn't being tracked in by vehicles.
 
  #12  
Old 08-12-16, 11:16 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Usa
Posts: 32
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The concrete has been poured and now it's time to cut my joints. Since I've poured to pads, I have a cold seem between the two so I essentially have two pads. One that is 40 x 32 and other that is 40 x 26. Where should I place the cuts? I know there are variables, but assume just a slab with no constraints. Just looking for general rule of thumb.
 
  #13  
Old 08-12-16, 06:59 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I'd split the 40'-dimension into quarters (10' each), and break the other directions into thirds (32/3 = 10'-8", and 26/3 = 8'-8"). Don't wait too long, or the cracking may already have started.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: