installation of antenna mast in the ground


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Old 09-07-16, 03:21 PM
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installation of antenna mast in the ground

Greetings all.

I have a need to put up a TV antenna on a mast that will be partially buried in the ground, Putting the antenna on a chimney or any part of the roof/house is not an option. I have a small hill in the back of my house, I need the height to reach the TV towers.

My general thoughts were to take an orange bucket from the DIY store, put a 2" pipe in the center, sticking out just above the bucket. Fill the cement in the bucket and let dry, then dig a hole in the ground, about the size of the bucket and bury it.

I would then take the antenna mast slide it inside the 2" pipe, hopefully with some set screws in the two inch pipe that will grab onto the mast and keep it from moving/spinning inside the 2" tube.

My end results should be with a mast that is no more than 12 foot above the ground. I read somewhere that for every 4 foot above the ground, 1 foot must be in ground. I plan on installing three antennas. Each antenna needs to be at least 3 feet apart. So, in theory my idea 'should' work

So, this is a very basic, off the cuff idea, kindly make recommendations.
 
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Old 09-07-16, 03:37 PM
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Standard antenna mast is thinwall 10'x1-1/4" pipe. With three antennas and no guy wires it would probably snap off at the ground.

You're going to mount three antennas 3' apart on 12' of mast ?
Won't that place the lowest antenna just off the ground ?
 
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Old 09-07-16, 03:38 PM
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If you use your criteria, a bucket may not work. Most 5 gallon buckets are about 18" tall, meaning you wouls need the depth of at least 2 buckets, if not 3 to stabilize your post. Why not just dig a hole of sufficient depth, place in your sleeve and pour it in concrete? Or you could use a new product specifically for posts. Sika 33 fl. oz. Fence Post Mix-483503 - The Home Depot
 
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Old 09-08-16, 05:19 AM
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I don't know why you would need the bucket. If you are wed to that approach why not just dig a hole and stick in the pole and fill the hole with concrete. It would easily allow you to go deeper and you won't have a problem with soft backfill around your bucket.

You say you want your mast no more than 12' above ground but three antennas spaced 3' apart will leave the the bottom one only 5' above ground. If going to the trouble of erecting an antenna mast I'd go higher to insure good reception and get the lower antenna higher to avoid damage.
 
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Old 09-08-16, 02:16 PM
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Thank you so much for this feedback. Some thoughts back from me

yes, guy wire at the collar of the pole and stringing 4 plastic coated wire definiely makes sense.I will implement that.
Yes, made sense not to use the bucket, looks like I will need to dig as least three feet deep, will get that cardboard sleeve and plan on using that instead. That makes sense as well.

This antenna will get installed in an open field type area that is well above my house's chimney, behind my house. No one walks around that area, its my property. I didn't think to put the antenna very high, didn't see the point, I'm aleady increasing the height location by moving it from the chimney to the hill. This way, if I need to do any maintenance on the antenna, like change or move it around, it is easily accessible and not requiring any big ladders.

My 'only' concern is that (from antenna properties perspectives) will there be signal issues. I read in the antenna blogs that if mounting two antennas on the same pole, put them far part so their signals don't cross each other. I'm thinking of putting three so that is a concern. I may have to post that question in that forum. Lastly, if using a 12ft pole, the very top antenna will be at 12ft mark, the 2nd one, at 9ft, the third at 6ft. So the last antenna is that much off the ground. I don't anticipate any issues being that low to the ground as I mentioned previously, on one should be walking around that area, its my property. If anyone, it would be only me =).

Given all that, I have considered putting up three 10ft poles and putting the antennas at the top of each pole. while, most likely, that is the best situation, I was trying to see if I can get away with just one pole. Less digging, Less cement, etc.

Going back to burying the pole itself. So, basically, digging a three feet hole, and burying the pipe in cement is still the best approach ? I still would want to bury a slight larger pipe and go with the set screws approach. It will make positioning the antennas easier, instead of moving each antenna one by one then locking them in place.

thanks again for all your feedback, it is greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 09-08-16, 03:31 PM
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I would not use a cardboard sleeve for anchoring your post. You will still have the problem with soft fill dirt around the perimeter. Just pour the concrete into your hole. That way the concrete can bear on virgin/compacted soil.
 
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Old 09-08-16, 03:36 PM
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Instead of using mast.... use heavy wall galvanized pipe. Maybe 1-1/4". I believe it comes in 20' lengths from a supply house.

Also... you cannot use plastic coated metal guy wire. The metal constitutes an unwanted ground plane. You'd need to use nylon only.
 
 

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