Garage surprise

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  #1  
Old 01-16-17, 03:22 PM
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Garage surprise

I just closed on a foreclosure home in New York that needs some rehab. It has a 1 car garage that I was not able to see inside of because it was locked with a key lock (left side, middle of door, can be seen in the photo) and my real estate agent could not track down anyone who had the key. I was not allowed to remove the lock until I owned the property.

To get to the point of my post, yesterday, I was able to cut off the lock and see the inside of the garage. To my surprise, the concrete driveway extended 1 foot into the garage, and the rest of the floor consisted of large pieces of old, rotting wood (the garage was built in 1920). The 2 times I saw the property before purchasing, it was cold and rainy and I didn't take a close look under the garage. Turns out the floor is held up by some old wooden piers.

My question is.....what are my options for getting a concrete garage floor without having to tear down the entire garage? Is there anything that can be done? Any other options?

Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 01-16-17, 03:31 PM
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You might be able to underpin the garage walls and then pour concrete.

I assume you knew ahead of time that it didn't have a concrete floor.
 
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Old 01-16-17, 03:36 PM
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Thanks for the quick reply marksr. Take a glance back at my first paragraph and you'll see that unfortunately, I was not able to see the garage floor ahead of time. It was an unpleasant surprise. When you say underpin, is that just supporting the garage walls? To pour concrete, I'm assuming they would have do dig down a bit and either pour or build a cinderblock foundation first, correct?
 
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Old 01-16-17, 03:39 PM
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The side pic of the house clearly shows that it doesn't have a concrete floor - it's built more like a shed.
Not sure exactly what it has for a foundation but you should be able to remove the floor framing and then either lay block [underpinning] under the sides to contain the concrete or use form boards. You'd likely want to add fill so the concrete isn't so thick.
 
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Old 01-16-17, 03:44 PM
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Ok, I get what you're saying. I'm thinking using form boards would be a lot less expensive than block. Could you venture a guess as to the approx cost? (the cost to hire someone to do it). The garage is 220 sq ft.
Thanks!
 
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Old 01-16-17, 03:46 PM
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I'm a painter so any guess I made would be a wild one! 3.5" thick concrete is 88 sq ft per yard if I remember correctly. The perimeter would be thicker. Pics of the interior might be helpful.
 
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Old 01-16-17, 04:22 PM
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I can get some inside pics but it may take a few days. While the door only looks slightly mangled in the pic, I was only able to lift it approx 1 1/2 feet so I didn't go inside. It's all messed up. The door will be the first thing to go.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 04:02 AM
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The dents in the door shouldn't affect it's operation but whatever damaged the door may have messed up the tracks or rollers. It's also possible something may have fallen in the way of the doors operation.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 04:26 AM
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To further Mark's comments, using concrete blocks as perimeter stops, you won't have to remove and discard wooden forms. Just leave them in place as support. We'll certainly look at the pictures when they get here.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 07:23 AM
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Floor

You will need just over 4 yards of concrete to make a 6 in. thick floor.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 01:23 PM
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Thanks for the replies!

marksr.....Yeah, I think it's an issue with the rollers. I'll be at the house tomorrow and will try again to get the door up higher so I can get in and get a few pics taken.

chandler....Are you saying to put down a perimeter of cinder blocks as close to the outside walls as possible, and then place the wooden forms against the blocks? (on the inside part where the concrete would be poured). If so, I would have to use concrete mortar to build the cinder block perimeter the same as if I was building a wall, correct?

wirepuller38....thanks for those figures!
 
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Old 01-17-17, 03:55 PM
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If you underpin the walls with block you won't need the form boards. Ideally the block would be mortared in place, the concrete could move the block if they are just sitting loose.
 
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Old 02-01-17, 05:07 PM
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marksr....you had asked for some pics of the inside of the garage. Sorry it took me so long to get them!! Here's what the inside looks like. This was as bright as I could get it.
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Old 02-02-17, 04:38 AM
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Couldn't tell a lot from the pics but basically you need to remove the wood floor so you can pour concrete. You don't want the concrete to come up past the bottom of the walls. Concrete can hold moisture and cause the wood to rot. Normally you'd add fill so your slab isn't thicker than 4" [or so] but if that is all the concrete you'll have brought in it might be cost effective to pour a thicker slab.
 
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Old 02-02-17, 03:01 PM
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Thanks, marksr. I've found a local concrete contractor and I think I'll give him a call and at least get an estimate on the cost. Appreciate your help!
 
 

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