Purchasing new home - Possible foundation issues?

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Old 09-19-17, 11:59 PM
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Purchasing new home - Possible foundation issues?

Had a home inspection today, starting to lose my mind a little.


Property is owned by a company / property management group. Little more then normal maintenance needed.

-Needs a roof (8K),
-needs immediate misc work (2-3k)
-needs paint on the ceilings except they've painted the one room which thermal detects an active leak from 2nd floor. ( mold probably?)
-There's a crack from the inside to the outside in the basement which they've DIY repaired. Can't tell but looks bigger then just a hairline. Windows don't open and close properly for the most part, a couple 45 angle drywall cracks... random repairs in the closets with puddy where they are unpainted or not painted as recently as the walls. House is totally empty.. except several sheets of drywall in the garage (maybe they've repaired the cracked drywall ?). 1979 home

negotiated a fair but not spectacular deal. Am I over-reacting? Do I hire a prof foundation expert after, If I can negotiate more off purchase price & get fix for leak under their insurance? Do I back out of the conditional deal?
 
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Old 09-20-17, 02:54 AM
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Welcome to the forums Nathan!

Have you had the house professionally inspected? best to hire one that works for you - not one recommended by the seller or realtor. You really need someone onsite to evaluate the issues. If the defects with the house scare you it might be best to walk away.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 04:44 AM
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As Marksr says. Do you have the funds available to fix all those things plus a bit more for the things you don't know about. You say a fair deal but not spectacular. A fair deal is one where both buyer and seller are happy with the price and merchandise. You don't sound comfortable with the deal.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 05:29 AM
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Despite the title to this Thread, this is not a new home . . . . it's nearly 40 years old, and shows evidence of alterations, both good and bad, made by prior Owners; but it will never be "new" again.

A crack in the foundation of a new home would be a serious issue; but a crack in the foundation (I assume poured concrete) has probably stabilized in its current position and isn't in motion in 2017. If that crack is active, and shows evidence of the home shifting, I would move on to something that you'll be happier with . . . . maybe a "New" home ?
 
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Old 09-20-17, 06:38 AM
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Hi Nathan and welcome to the forum.

Is there a reason why you want this particular house, location, other.

Are you planning to live in the house or flip it?
Being owned by a property management group as opposed to a regular home owner they will probably mark as "unknown" most of the disclaimer form, leaving you with no prior knowledge of major issues, they win and you lose.

1979 is borderline for the presence of lead solder use for plumbing and asbestos. Both need to be tested for and certified as NOT PRESENT. Lead paint that has been painted over would still leave you with the problem.

There is a ton you are overlooking or haven't mentioned. Heating system, water heater, past utility bills, A search for prior permits, city water and sewer or well and septic, and more.

You need a great price after accounting for everything that a top notch inspector will find. It sounds like the inspection you got was cosmetic, typical when the real estate agency does not want to find problems.

I'll wait for your return.

Bud
 
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Old 09-20-17, 07:48 AM
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Apologize for the misleading title, meant new to me. This is our first home and we plan on living here 5-10 yrs. we aren't overly handy.


thanks for the replies! The heating system was replaced in 2005 and has no record of ever being serviced. New hot water tank 2017. We asked for utilities but they said as it was rented they do not know. No info about plumbing other then abs and has some areas of improper slope. No info on lead paint. The other detail I may add is that there's a door in the basement that now won't close. The French doors for tne home the deadbolt won't lock. The safety door to the basement in sitting in the garage.Small things but do they add up?

we like the home as it's 3-400 sq feet bigger then most for this price point but we're not that attached. If the owner does not agree to help with costs I do not have the cash to do it all.

http://www.homeinspectorpro.com/index.php?option=com_clientreport&Itemid=64&fileName=704_Woodpark_Blvd_SW_9-19-17-Report-367731.pdf&inspector=pcrenos
 
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Old 09-20-17, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by NathanT84
". . . If the owner does not agree to help with costs I do not have the cash to do it all . . ."
Lenders are usually quite willing to add the costs of bonafide improvements to the amount of the Mortgage . . . . that just adds to the value of the collateral supporting the loan.

If you're interested, the local utilities are often willing to supply the consumption of Water, KWHs or CCFs by prior Tenants or Owners . . . . it's not such a "confidential" item, and more likely to be accurate when provided by the supplier.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 09:37 AM
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Saying you wouldn't have the cash makes me wonder if you need to lower the price you think you can pay as even homes without issues require a lot of money above and beyond mortgage and insurance that homeowners often fail to anticipate.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 11:11 AM
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This is what the cracks look like
 
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Old 09-20-17, 11:41 AM
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Is that a poured concrete foundation . . . . it looks like cinderblock with a skim coat of cement slathered on to give it a stucco appearance that might hide blemishes ?

What was the appearance on the inside ?

Mind updating your profile to include the State, Commonwealth, or Province that you and the Property are located in ?
 
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Old 09-20-17, 11:47 AM
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https://goisn.net/pchomeinspections/...IAWAAYBg%3D%3D





It's Calgary alberta.PG 42 has interior basement picture. I think it's poured concrete but I do agree it looks like they may have put something over top of the exterior
 
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Old 09-20-17, 01:51 PM
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I didn't gain much by looking at Page 42's Pictures; but the INspector did state elsewhere that it was a "Poured Concrete " Foundation . . . . so I wonder why the smeared on cement ?

And why would the cement be smeared on the basement window casing or window frame; that indicates a fairly recent application (cement on wood doesn't stand up for long) . . . . and yet, it's older than the caulk that was placed in the crack that appeared when the cement shrunk !

That lattice work is also very new . . . . what's hiding behind it ?

And the rust stains on the cement stucco, any idea of the source of that dampened ferrous oxide ?
 
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Old 09-20-17, 06:52 PM
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Yeah all good questions. Loved the house itself but weighing our options and input from others we'll keep looking at other houses.
 
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Old 09-22-17, 12:43 PM
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I would have a foundation company have a look at those diagonal cracks. They aren't that unusual for a house that age, and there are some good modern repair methods that are reasonably cheap if you repair it when it's a crack before it's a disaster.

Given that you have visible cracks in both interior and exterior finish surfaces it suggests one of the corners of the foundation has sunk a little bit. This can be normal as long as it has found its resting point and doesn't continue to sink.
 
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