Xylene Sprayer

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Old 01-14-20, 02:49 PM
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Xylene Sprayer

I'm looking for a hand-held sized sprayer to use on a regular daily basis for its misting capabililties. I've tried numerous sprayers, even industrial grade and they all fail, breaking down after about 3 or 4 days of use. Recommendations?
 
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Old 01-14-20, 02:53 PM
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What in the world are you using a xylene mister for?
 
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Old 01-14-20, 09:49 PM
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Xylene mister.
Xylene is primarily used as a solvent (a liquid that can dissolve other substances),
particularly in the printing, rubber and leather industries.


Not the type of chemical you usually mist. Basically a toxic cleaning agent.
It may eat basic plastic misters.
 
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Old 01-15-20, 04:10 AM
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I'm also curious as to the application. I've used Xylene as a solvent and as a thinner for a few select coatings but never heard of anyone continuously misting something with it. It's a very strong solvent.
 
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Old 01-15-20, 08:11 AM
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I've tried numerous sprayers, even industrial grade and they all fail, breaking down after about 3 or 4 days of use.
Sounds like the xylene is dissolving the seals on the sprayers.

You might have to find some silane (NOT silicone) or teflon based seals that xylene doesn't break down.

Recommendations?
Well, Try and find a less toxic/less volatile priming/stripping agent.

It MIGHT be a time to consider an over-night-application. Sometimes a weaker solvent acting over a longer time makes more sense on a cost-per-unit basis.

Most State Dept. of Environmental resources will actually have a resource library of more environmentally friendly alternatives to the nastier chemicals.
I know a DER offical who's job included a free audit /review of manufacturing processes to suggest ways to reduce the disposal costs. Basically, "if YOU come to US for help, we promise no fines."

(tangent) Which brings me to the "hazardous waste onions" story that might apply here.

A local small-volume high-cost-per-unit business had evolved from re-chroming bumpers to custom metal plating & coating and making custom circuit boards.
They had to pay a fair price for hazardous waste removal, charged by the pound.
Their largest cost was from the plating line, and the line-item read
"HAZARDOUS WASTE - ONIONS 50 lbs."

This was because with every new plating run, they dumped a large raw Vidalia onion into the bath. Nobody knew why, only "that's the way we've always done it, why change?" Somebody finally tracked down the old-man, to ask why-

"If the onion starts to cook, that means the plating bath is too hot."

Or course, their equipment now has temperature controls, so they avoid having to pay disposal fees for their heavy-metal-soaked hazardous waste onions...
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 01-15-20 at 08:48 AM.
 

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