Need advice with drilling into concrete wall


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Old 12-08-23, 01:09 PM
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Need advice with drilling into concrete wall

I tried to drill into my concrete wall today but there are random pebbles or small rocks inside the walls. And when i hit it, i can drill no further. I have a basic drill machine that was only $60 so i assume it's not up to the task. I either hit a pebble, or often it doesn't go straight and makes a bigger hole and eventually i'm left with a big hole that's unusable. The concrete wall is of poor material and the inside crumbles very fast.

Is it necessary for me to buy an expensive $200 range concrete drill? And is it necessary to buy specific concrete/stone drill parts to create the holes with?

Thank you for the support! You guys always help me in the right direction and i really appreciate it.
 
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Old 12-08-23, 01:30 PM
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Concrete normally has small rocks in it.

As a pro we use a hammer drill. It pounds on the bit while it drills.
Even at that.... it can be tough to get holes in concrete.

How many holes and what size do you need to drill ?
 
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Old 12-08-23, 02:12 PM
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What drill do you have? Is there a knob or dial that has a symbol that looks a bit like Thor's hammer?

As Pjmax mentioned a hammer drill is really the tool for the job. That with a carbide tipped masonry bit can drill through concrete and the rocks inside. You don't need an expensive, commercial duty drill. Many less expensive cordless drills have a hammer drill function but they are generally more expensive than drills without that feature.

You mentioned that the concrete is of really poor material. That can pose a problem and be more difficult to drill than good concrete which is harder. The problem is the drill chews through the soft cement but the hard rocks cause the drill bit to go off course creating an egg, oval or cone shaped hole.
 
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Old 12-08-23, 04:20 PM
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Unfortunately my small black and decker drill doesn't have a hammer function. I bought a wall table/desk from ikea that's foldable to save space. But it needs 7 or 8 holes to be drilled into the wall.

I'm also not sure how long the screws should be anchored in them to provide good stability, but i think 3-4 inch screws should be of enough length?

I think i'll buy a decent hammer drill with carbide tipped masonry bits. If it's a good drill then it will be worth the investment. Hopefully it can get through the rocks, if not, all i can do is move an inch to the side or higher or lower and try again. But i can only place the table in 1 corner of the wall at a specific height, so i can only try it 2 more times. I'll hope for the best.

Thank you for the advice everyone! I appreciate it a lot.

 
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Old 12-08-23, 04:29 PM
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If you expect to have a future use for a hammer drill than it is a good investment. If not, check with a local tool rental company.

I have one and I probably use it once every couple of years.
 
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Old 12-08-23, 05:49 PM
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Time was I was poor and tried to do jobs without equipment made for the job. An old timer told me that using a carbide bit sometimes put a glaze on the concrete part way it and if you broke that glaze you could continue drilling. I hit a point when the drill refused and put in a masonry nail, gave it a couple raps and drilled some more. I don’t know if my friend was right about a glaze but it did work to fracture the bottom of the hole and drill some more. For only a few holes that might be worth a try. Like cwbuff, I don’t use my big hammer drill often but I am sure glad I got it for the job I got it for. It paid for itself in a couple days. Nothing like the right tool for the job but sometimes there are other ways for a one off.
 
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Old 12-11-23, 11:42 AM
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If you have a Cresco Rents or similar near you, they rent rotary hammers by the day and will also provide the bits you need. I'd recommend a rotary hammer over a hammer drill if you have aggregate with stones embedded in it.
 
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Old 12-19-23, 01:35 PM
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That is awesome advice.

I will rent a rotary hammer drill for now. I saw the differences vs a standard hammer drill on youtube and there's just no comparison. I need to get through the aggregate without going off course. I'll rent it now and hopefully buy one in the future when i can afford it. I appreciate all the advice! Happy holidays everyone.
 

Last edited by cementnoobie; 12-19-23 at 02:18 PM.
 

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