crushed limestone driveway


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Old 03-29-24, 04:38 PM
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crushed limestone driveway

Looking to install 150' or so of straight driveway.

Hoping to use crushed limestone. What size should I look at? Quick searches say 1/2 (57 limestone), 3/4 (610 limestone) and 1 1/2 inch, so I'm here to see what you guys say.

Sandy loam soil, have a tractor with box and front loader, first timer.
 
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Old 03-29-24, 06:59 PM
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I'd get crushed 3/4 minus.
 
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Old 03-30-24, 02:03 AM
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If you expect the gravel to sink into the dirt you'd want to start with larger rock and finish with finer.
Normally the truck driver will spread the gravel for you so you shouldn't need to do a lot of tractor work.
 
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Old 03-30-24, 05:47 AM
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I use "crusher run" which is a blend of 1 1/2" minus. It includes all sizes from 1 1/2" down to dust. The various sizes fill in the voids and it packs down well. Clean stones like #57 are a more uniform size so they don't pack down, instead remaining more like marbles which move around more.

First I mark out the driveway location and width. Then I like to set the blade or box at an angle. I run the deep edge of the blade along the outside edge of the driveway. Do this for both sides so you end up with the center being high sloping down to a trench about 4" deep at the edges. The trench retains the stone. It also allows you to have a good 4" thick stone base at the edge for support but it's level with the ground for easy mowing so your mower doesn't eat rocks. The high center is good for drainage.
 
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Old 03-30-24, 01:08 PM
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I'd be somewhat cautious about limestone- not sure where the OP if from, but in my area of SE Pennsylvania, we have VERY different qualities of stone, depending on which quarry you get it from-
From cheap red shale which turns to mud in 2 years, to limestone that lasts 10 years, then blue shale which lasts 20, metamorphic 'baked' shake that lasts 40, and finally diabase / basalt that effectively lasts forever.

Our gravel driveway, quality wise, was always used at least blue shale, and got the 2A modified which has stone + screenings, because that sets and compacts to a hard surface.
For the top surface of the driveway, especially the entrance where you need good tire grip when accelerating out onto the road, or decelerating to pull into the driveway, and ALSO need grip to turn- I'd specifically get 'screenings' which are popcorn kernel sized bits of rock with stone dust- sprinkle some dry lime on top /in between layers as you rake it out, and it sets up almost like plaster - a hard and flat surface which you can easily shovel snow from, without any gravel coming loose.
 
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Old 04-03-24, 06:02 AM
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In Texas. Been hearing horror stories about crushed concrete (rebar, etc.) and nothing but praise for crushed limestone in my neck of the woods.
 
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Old 04-03-24, 06:23 AM
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might come down to what is less expensive by the dump truck load but a course larger rock base followed by crushed limestone on top for any future applications would likely be how I would go the crushed limestone or crusher run does compact well eventually.
 
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Old 04-03-24, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by [url=https://www.doityourself.com/forum/members/667393-raysanyahoo
raysanyahoo[/url]]In Texas. Been hearing horror stories about crushed concrete (rebar, etc.) and nothing but praise for crushed limestone in my neck of the woods.
Ah, limestone in Texas should work fine. Wet it down and the limestone should harden into something like desert coliche. You might want to do a top coat of crushed sandstone.

We have some places that recycle and crush concrete, but more common for driveways and parking areas are the millings when an asphalt road is ground down before being repaved.
They're usually available when a local road is redone, so it is not always available.
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Old 04-06-24, 06:07 AM
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Crushed limestone is the worst possible material for a driveway. Limestone (calcium carbonate) effervesces with water (is water loving) and breaks down over time leaving you with a cakey mess. Use a good alluvial aggregate like crusher run from an alluvial pit, which would be granitic. Smaller particles fill the voids and larger ones provide strength. 1/2" would be OK, but I would recommend a larger size like 3/4" (depending on what is on offer in your area). Anything but limestone. The only reason that limestone is ever used anywhere is on account of its abundance and its low price, never because of its quality (alluvial material is around a 7 on the Mohs scale of materials hardness whereas limestone is about a 3-4). Any road built with limestone will have turned into mud over several years. If the locale happens to have freeze thaw cycles, the asphalt will be cracked in a few years - the reason so many roads in North America do NOT last very long and seem to start cracking almost as soon as they are built. In areas where good alluvial material is available and there are no freeze thaw cycles a road can easily last many decades.
 
 

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