Upgrading 70/80s framed kitchen cabinets?

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Old 01-16-16, 07:44 AM
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Upgrading 70/80s framed kitchen cabinets?

Hi,

We have a kitchen with old framed cabinets. Probably from the 70s or 80s. Functionally they are OK but cosmetically they don't look so good anymore. I am attaching a couple of photos.

What are our options for fixing up what we have that would be significantly cheaper than simply replacing the cabinets entirely? Whatever needs to be done, I would be hiring someone most likely rather than trying to do it myself.

So should we refinish them? Or replace the doors? I found a couple of cabinet door places online but how do we figure out if what they have will fit our cabinets and can be installed in place of the original doors?

Thanks!

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Old 01-16-16, 07:55 AM
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Cabinet Doors

A good on-line cabinet door dealer will make custom-sized doors based on your measurements. Study and follow the dealer's measuring instructions very carefully. I would suggest ordering doors made from the same wood species as the frames. The challenge will be to get the finish on the doors to match the finish on the frames. Others will chime in on how to do this. Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 01-16-16, 08:25 AM
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Oak is tough to strip for refinishing. The wood soaked up a lot of stain and the pores are deep.

I was a professional cabinet refacer for a number of years. The process was new doors, drawer fronts, drawers. The cabinet boxes are covered in laminate or veneer.

For my own kitchen I just painted the face frames rather than laminate them. The new doors and other items make a huge difference.

I wouldn't recommend you hire a contractor to do this though, you save a lot by DIY.
If you want to hire a contractor, I would recommend new cabinets and counter.
 
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Old 01-16-16, 09:27 AM
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If you decide to paint the cabinets I wouldn't strip the existing finish but sand it lightly and apply a coat of solvent based primer. That along with a couple coats of latex enamel will help some with the open grain. Fillers can be used if the grain is too open.
 
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Old 01-17-16, 01:28 PM
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Chalk paint

I would use economical chalk paint and contemporary hardware on the cabinets.
Demo the counter tops and replace with backboard, ceramic tile and a glass tile back-splash. Cheap and quick.:HF2:
 
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Old 01-22-16, 01:06 PM
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Thank you very much everyone for the info.

In the bathroom (not shown in the pix) I have the same type of cabinet for the vanity, and it looks just as old and worn out. Before deciding on the kitchen, I want to do a test run on the bathroom cabinet. So what I am thinking of doing is more or less this:
1. Lightly sand the cabinet (the frame, doors, everything)
2. Fix any small damage (cracks, chips, etc)
3. Paint dark, maybe even black. Since the original (oak) cabinet is dark, I want to make sure the old color does not show through the new paint
4. Add new hardware to the doors
5. Install a new vanity top and faucet

Questions:
For #1:
- What grain sandpaper should I use?
- Would this be practical to do by hand, or do I need some type of power/belt sander?
For #2:
- Should I use wood putty for this or something else? Most damage is around edges/corners.
For #3:
- Any particular type of paint I should use or should avoid?
- Should I use a solvent based primer before I paint? Some other primer?
 
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Old 01-22-16, 01:17 PM
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Oak is a tough wood to paint due to its pores.

Take a look here: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/fu...t-repaint.html
 
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Old 01-22-16, 01:46 PM
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Thanks!!!

One question: you say "Prime with a white-pigmented shellac based primer*". If I want to paint the door black, should I use a dark-colored primer as well?
 
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Old 01-22-16, 02:42 PM
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If you use oil base black, I'd be tempted to skip the primer. If you use latex paint you'll need to use either a pigmented shellac or oil base primer. I don't recall ever having applied a tinted shellac primer but you can get oil base primer tinted a dark gray.
 
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Old 01-25-16, 06:18 PM
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So I went to HDepot today and bought this: Rust-Oleum Transformations Dark Color Cabinet Kit (9-Piece)-258240 - The Home Depot

Why? The guy in the paint dept recommended it and I figured I'll get more info about it and return it if it's not what I need.

Has anyone here had any experience with this product?
 
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Old 01-26-16, 03:30 AM
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I've never used that product or otherwise know anything about it. The fact that is it waterbased makes me leery although the use of a liquid deglosser first might give it a fighting chance. A big problem with big box employee recommendations is many of them only know what they've read and don't have any actual experience or feedback on the products they sell.
 
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Old 01-31-16, 12:41 PM
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In the last few days I got two quotes: one for replacing the cabinets with new ones, the other for painting them. Leaning toward the latter, and I don't think it's going to be a DIY project. The painter said that he prefers to use latex-based outdoor furniture paint like this. Do you think it's a good idea?
 
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Old 01-31-16, 01:23 PM
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I wouldn't use any paint from that store nor would I use an outdoor paint inside. Personally, I would pass on this contractor. Oil based enamel is fine in non-white colors, waterborne enamel is the best choice for white and just fine for colors as well.
 
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Old 01-31-16, 01:28 PM
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It can be a diy project but a lot depends on your motivation

Exterior coatings are allowed more off gasing than interior coatings and generally have a slightly softer finish to help them withstand the elements. I would use a solvent based primer followed by 2 coats of waterborne enamel.
 
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Old 01-31-16, 07:25 PM
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I wouldn't use any paint from that store
Why not? Is paint at Lowes better? Otherwise where would you recommend I get the paint?
 
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Old 01-31-16, 07:57 PM
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Better paint, equipment and advice can be gotten from a paint store than a paint department.
 
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Old 02-01-16, 03:28 AM
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Big box paint depts tend to stock coatings based on low price instead of quality. They also have a limited selection of coatings. A dedicated paint store [most any brand] will have a better selection and more knowledgeable staff. You rarely see professional painters trading at a big box ..... and it doesn't have to do with the price per gallon.
 
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Old 02-01-16, 02:43 PM
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I stopped by Sherwin Williams today and they recommended this paint. Claimed that it was very durable and designed specifically for this type of job. Anyone has experience with this product or this competitor?
 
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Old 02-01-16, 02:52 PM
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While I've not used that exact label, I have used it's predecessor and believe it to be the best interior enamel I've ever used. Since I'm retired I don't know if it is the exact same enamel with a new label or if it's 'new and improved' At any rate I wouldn't hesitate to paint cabinets with it over the proper primer! I'm not overly familiar with BM's coating lines but have no doubt that their version is just as good.
 
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Old 02-02-16, 07:52 AM
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I used to use only Benjamin Moore paints but have since moved and now the Sherwin Williams store is closer so I'm switching over. Go with something from one of their better lines (I won't use anyone's bottom of the line paint) and I think you'll get good results.
 
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Old 02-02-16, 09:24 AM
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As far as I know, ProClassic is SWP's top of the line enamel.
 
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Old 02-02-16, 03:26 PM
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I don't paint cabinets, I rip out and install new. If the old cabinets were painted by the homeowner, the number one problem I notice is hardness. The paint might look great, but is still tacky after months or years.

I'm not sure of the reason the paint never seems to cure.
 
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Old 02-03-16, 03:28 AM
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Assuming any grease or other contaminants were removed, oil base and waterborne enamels will dry to a hard film. Latex enamels are prone to stick the cheaper ones are worse than the quality latex enamels. Obviously the proper primer is needed to insure good long term adhesion.
 
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