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Issue with mounting of trim and vinyl replacment windows

Issue with mounting of trim and vinyl replacment windows

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  #1  
Old 02-16-16, 07:27 PM
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Issue with mounting of trim and vinyl replacment windows

When I moved in the previous owner had vinyl replacement windows installed. On the interior of the house they are pretty far in but not far enough. As you can see from the photo the old window frame extends past the vinyl window, and annoyingly halfway between the face of the drywall and the inside of the frame of the window. I've trimed many windows in the house, with various schemes, notching the 1x that I use as a gap filler, splitting the difference with a 1x at an angle, and various other methods. This time I wanted to do it "right" so I thought I would trim the window frame back flush with the window using an oscillating tool. I purchased a Craftsman 19.2v tool. It is VERY slow going, about 2-3" a minute and takes 2 batteries to do one window. Should I get a corser bit? a 120v oscillating tool? Just leave the wood and continue to modify the trim pieces as I did before?

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  #2  
Old 02-16-16, 07:55 PM
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You wasted your time cutting it off, imo. What you need to do is add a 1/2" strip (nailer) onto the jamb to make it flush with the drywall. This strip will be completely covered by more trim... its only purpose is to give you something to nail to. Once it's on, apply a "stop" of your choice onto the inside perimeter of that... it will be ripped however wide it needs to be in order to span from the window to the level of your finished wall. Then apply your casing onto the wall surface, overlapping the face of the stop an appropriate amount.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 08:47 PM
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Trimming the window out as X says is the way to go, there's usually plenty of reveal around the new frame to build up the jambs.

Replacement window frames are not intended to be flush with the interior wall surface after installation.
This is not a down side and usually isn't a problem because they are being installed into a finished opening.
 
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Old 02-17-16, 05:09 AM
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Should be filling any larger gaps with low expanding foam, smaller gaps get caulked then installing the apron and stool first, jamb extensions that sit flush with the drywall, then the casing.
Google "jamb extensions" there's lot's of videos and info on just how to do it.
I agree, huge mistake to be cutting anything off like that.
 
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Old 02-17-16, 09:49 AM
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There are no jamb extensions.Based on the pictures I'm seeing on google.

Jeff
 
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Old 02-17-16, 10:00 AM
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So a 1/2" strip is the way to go. But then I need something inside that to hide the gap between the wood and the window frame, and that I added a 1/2" strip, correct? These window frame pieces are NOT even with the drywall, they vary their distance to the drywall between 1/2" back to flush in some areas. If they were flush with the drywall that would be ideal I agree with that. or if they were flush with the window surface. The issue is they are neither flush nor even.

Can someone send a pic or link to a 1/2" nailer. Sounds like a piece of wood but I'm not sure.

Jeff
 
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Old 02-17-16, 11:44 AM
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You can not just buy a 1/2 piece of wood and expect it to fit.
Jamb extensions are ripped to size according to the width need to reach from the new window frame and the drywall.
Here's one of the hundred's I found when I Googled "jamb extensions".
How to Make Window Jamb Extensions — Stonehaven Life
 
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Old 02-17-16, 11:59 AM
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look at my photo please joecaption, how can I attach a jamb extension I only have 1/2-1/4" of surface area exposed? It won't hold.
 
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Old 02-17-16, 05:23 PM
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So a 1/2" strip is the way to go. But then I need something inside that to hide the gap between the wood and the window frame, and that I added a 1/2" strip, correct?
Exactly.

Sounds like a piece of wood but I'm not sure.
1/2" x 3/4" strip of wood. You have a table saw, I hope?

they vary their distance to the drywall between 1/2" back to flush in some areas.
All you need to do is lay a square or straight edge on the wall. Measure back to your jamb. If it's an 1/8" on top and 1/2" on the bottom, then make a tapered piece that is 1/8" on one end and 1/2" on the other. This isn't rocket science. It will be covered up so it doesn't have to be perfect. Its better if it's behind the drywall than if it sticks out beyond the drywall. The only purpose of this piece is so that you have more wood there to nail to when you put on your next piece, which will be the trim piece everyone will see. It will probably also need to be tapered if it is as bad as you say.

This is not that hard, don't over think it. If you have questions, re-read the replies until it makes sense.
 
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Old 02-17-16, 07:33 PM
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Thanks X. I'll use that method. I'm not sure adding the small piece of wood will help create much of a nailing surface but I'll give it a try. I have plenty of 1x I can rip down to create a shim.
 
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Old 02-17-16, 08:45 PM
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For your tapers, they don't have to be perfect. You can stairstep them... set fence to 1/4... cut a few inches... bump it out 1/16... go a few inches... bump it out another 1/16, etc. progressively until you get to 1/2". The main thing is to just line up the inside edge with your jamb so that the stop you put on next will sit nice and square, so that it doesn't want to rock back into that void where the drywall is. You're right that in areas where its only 1/8" that isn't going to help with the nailing surface... but you can use your judgment... some may not need anything if you dont think its worth it. In your pics it doesn't look like you have much jamb in front of the replacement window to nail your new stops to - which is why we are suggesting you add these extension jambs. The one pictured in your photo above DEFINITELY needs one. Can't say that's the case for every window since we can't see them.
 
 

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