contingency for materials


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Old 06-21-16, 09:29 AM
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contingency for materials

I'm measuring up the wood to order for wood paneling in a room.
Looks to be around 210sq ft.
What percentage contingency should I add as standard for this - rough guess?
It's more if I'm doing the work, less if a skilled contractor does it.
Could be some wood wastage from cuts, mistakes with tinting, etc.
 
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Old 06-21-16, 10:23 AM
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If you can, re-measure the room taking into account that studs are 16" on center and may not have anything to do with the room layout. Your panels will have to overlap on one of the studs and work outward from there. This will tell you how much waste per wall and if that waste can be utilized somewhere else in the room.
 
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Old 06-21-16, 10:37 AM
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Generally 10% is my minimum, and it goes up from there to 25% or more on some projects.

Things I factor in:

Is it rough framing, finish work, or something special (Real wood paneling falls into my special category)
Will it be painted or stained?
Do I have to select for color and/or grain match?
How big a project...larger projects have more opportunity to reuse "mistakes" or to use lower quality pieces where they won't matter.
If I have to buy more material, is availability or matching going to be a problem?
Is it specialized material where extra material won't be useful for another project?
Am I buying premium grade material or big box store grade material?

And one general rule over and above those factors...I usually assume I'm going to mess up the longest/widest piece....
 
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Old 06-21-16, 10:56 AM
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As it's paneling, I thought most of the panels will be nailed into the noggins or top/bottom plates and studs if they are there. They will slot into each in the grooves otherwise.
 
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Old 06-21-16, 11:00 AM
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Paneling

When using 4x8 sheets to panel a wall which is 8 feet or less in height, measure the distance around the room and divide by 4. This gives the number of panels needed.

Looks to be around 210sq ft
Is this the area of the wall or the area of the floor? The area of the wall is the distance along each wall added together and multiplied by the height of the wall.
 
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Old 06-21-16, 11:53 AM
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Yeah, it's a really small reception/entrance room.
It is 2 side walls, 1 end wall, 1 front wall minus front door space/cavity, ceiling.
I'm not using sheets, I'm using wood panels. The 7inch ones that slot into each other.
 
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Old 06-21-16, 02:05 PM
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Never used those but I suspect you will need some horizontal boards to support the space between the studs, perhaps 3 horizontal runs. I'm sure Z knows.

Bud
 
 

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