Nailing Batt

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Old 07-14-16, 01:59 PM
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Nailing Batt

I almost never work on manufactured homes. Customer wants scribe and batten throughout a room.
The walls are flexible and nailing doesn't sound right to me, it seems it would take a lot of nails.
The walls are painted.
 
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Old 07-14-16, 02:01 PM
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Is this a manufactured home that is set on a site built foundation or a mobile home? Most modern day mobile homes use 1/4" drywall on the walls. Not sure I understand just what the job entails
 
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Old 07-14-16, 03:31 PM
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It's like a regular house but the wall sheathing is thin hardboard. So if you are nailing away from the top or bottom of wall or a "stud", the wall covering gives a little.

Understand I haven't tried to nail yet, just looking for a heads up. I'll do the job Saturday.
 
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Old 07-14-16, 03:33 PM
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I wouldn't think it would be a big issue if you are using a nail gun.
 
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Old 07-14-16, 04:43 PM
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I had to Google scribe and batten.

So you are putting up thin 4x8 sheets of some type of wall covering, then nailing up 1/4" x 3/4" screen moulding over the seams and edges?

Sounds like a job for colored panel nails (a painted ring shank finish nail) and some panel adhesive. A trim gun might blow through a thin panel and if the panels are prefinished, will leave holes to fill (with what) so the only place to use a trim gun is on the molding, unless its prefinished too.
 
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Old 07-14-16, 04:44 PM
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Going to have to use an adhesive as well as a fasteners.
Loc Tite Quick Grab and my narrow crown staple gun is what's worked for me, with the adhesive very few fasteners are needed.
Use the shortest staples possible to avoid hitting a wire.
 
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Old 07-14-16, 07:04 PM
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The panels are original to the home. Sounds like everybody agrees a little quick grab adhesive in addition to the brad gun or pin-nailer is best.
I try to avoid adhesive if at all possible and that was my concern.
 
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Old 07-15-16, 05:37 AM
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A trim gun might blow through a thin panel and if the panels are prefinished, will leave holes to fill (with what) so the only place to use a trim gun is on the molding, unless its prefinished too.
You have to turn the air pressure down to make sure the nails don't blow thru or sink too deep. Colored putty does a good job of making the nail holes disappear. A rag damp with mineral spirits does a good job of removing any excess putty around the hole which is especially important if you aren't applying a finish over it.
 
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Old 07-15-16, 06:26 AM
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Fasteners

A narrow crown staple gun may prevent blow-through.
 
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Old 07-16-16, 06:04 AM
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One word of caution. We had to go in a manufactured home to replace subflooring that had been removed by mold remediation people. They left the walls hanging from the top plate, but the walls and plates were all 1x3's Originally had paneling up so I guess attaching it in a factory would be fine, but in the field, if you are off by 1/4" with a nail, you are OFF. I replaced all the studs with 2x3's so at least the rocker would stand a better chance of hitting one when they put up sheetrock.
 
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Old 07-16-16, 06:13 AM
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Mobile homes use a wide variety of wall framing. I've seen 2x4s, 2x2s, 1x4s, 1x3s and 1x2s. Some MHs are built decent but others are put together as cheaply as possible.
 
 

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