Coping crown molding issues

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Old 11-05-16, 02:30 PM
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Coping crown molding issues

I'm trying my first hand at crown molding. I've watch endless videos on YouTube about coping the corners and for some reason mine are just not coming out well at all. The bottom corner looks like it's a 1/4 in away from the other piece. I've check the spring angle on my jig and it's good. I have a gauge to measure the wall which it's a 44.5 degree inside corner. My saw is square and plum as well. I can't for the life of me figure out why the is coping is not working. Any help will be much appreciated
 
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Old 11-05-16, 03:55 PM
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Welcome to the forums Andrew!

IMO crown molding is probably the most difficult trim to cut/install. If it's painted you might do better just cutting the miter and then caulking once it's nailed up. If the crown is stained I'd work at getting it right so you can cope. I can't help much there but one of the carpenters should be along shortly.
 
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Old 11-05-16, 04:11 PM
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Sounds like you are rolling the crown too high up the wall compared with how you are holding it on the saw when you cut it.

You are holding the crown upside down when you cut it, right?
 
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Old 11-05-16, 04:20 PM
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How are you coping your corners?
Usually you cut a normal corner (upside down and backwards) and use that cut mark as your scribe line.
Scribing crown requires a severely angled back cut and I try to avoid it if possible. It helps to have a quality jigsaw with a very thin scribe blade.
I only scribe crown when it's being painted. For finished crown I always cut the corners at angles and glue. The angles are easier to figure out if you use the upside down and backwards method.
 
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Old 11-06-16, 04:16 AM
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Cutting cove is a challenge, everything is upside down and backwards on the saw so you have to get your mind wrapped around it.

Best tip I can give, which saved me a lot of material, is to make a set of inside and outside samples.

Mark them with "ceiling side, saw side, LH & RH" keep them as your master templates and they will save you from making that "ohh ship" cut that wastes a 16' or material.

If not clear on concept let me know and I can post a picture!
 
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Old 11-06-16, 04:28 AM
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I agree with Marq1. In also made a set of templates. Saves a lot of time in the long run.
 
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Old 11-06-16, 11:20 AM
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Angle

A 45 degree corner would be sawed at 22.5 degrees to get the cope line.
 
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Old 11-07-16, 05:16 AM
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I'm using a jig to cut the molding. Doing it upside down to cut it. Using a coping saw to cut the wood to get it to fit. Also using a guague to find the angle of the wall. Mostly the walls are pretty square for my old house. They are all about 44.5 degrees. I'd post some pictures but not sure how to on the mobile site
 
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Old 11-07-16, 06:43 AM
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I don't use a jig when cutting upside down and backwards. I assume the jig you're using holds the crown against the fence at a certain angle.
I use my fingers to hold the crown and gently rock it into position. You can get a feel for when it's square against the fence.
Once you hold the piece square and make a clean cut, you can then gently rock the top of the molding up or down and make another cut to fine tune your angles. You must hold the molding firmly and use outrigger supports.
For instance if you want to shave a little off the top (closing the gap at the bottom), you will rock and gently raise the height of the crown against the fence.
A thin flat shim between your stops and the material will also force the top of the crown to move up on the fence.
 
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Old 11-07-16, 07:10 AM
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Your jig would be to match the spring angle, and I'm not sure but I think with the cuttn crown jigs you don't put it upside down. As Brian says, a jig isn't necessary if you hold it in position properly.
 
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