Installing a cabinet door in a drywalled storage area

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Old 01-01-17, 07:18 PM
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Installing a cabinet door in a drywalled storage area

I have framed a small 15"w X 17"d storage closet next to a shower. It's a didn't-think-too-hard-when-building-it type of a deal. I want to have a door for the closet but I also want to maximize the width of the pull-out drawers I'm planning to put in there. So I wouldn't want to put any material in the opening that I don't absolutely need. As you see in the picture, the left side has no jamb or anything, just a continuous wall to the end of the storage area. I realize I need at least a door stop there, depending on what I end up doing. Being against an adjoining wall also creates some challenges for the door swing. Ideally it would be a left-swing door but I also have wainscoting butting against the closet and the cap trim that sticks out about 1/2". The door would have to open at least 90░ to get those darn drawers out. Alternatively a right-swing door that opens about 180░ would work.

I'm a little lost on this one and don't know what the best thing to do is.

Could I just mount a hinge directly on the right side into the 2X4 behind the drywall? As stated earlier, I don't want to squeeze the opening more than I have to so choosing a hinge that takes little space would also be nice. Making it look decent is also a bonus

Appreciate any advice. Sorry for not having all the terminology down.

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Old 01-01-17, 08:15 PM
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Why would you put a cabinet door over the top of drawers instead of just using drawer faces? You could make a 1X2 face frame for the entire unit that overlaps the end wall on the right, and butts into the wall on the left. Cleats on the left wall would be needed to fasten the left side of the face frame. A cabinet door could then be installed using face frame 3/4" overlay hinges on the left- this puts the edge of the door 3/4" away from the wall. Typically you might have cabinet doors on the top half with shelves, then drawer faces on the bottom half. The drawer boxes will be about 2" narrower than your current opening, due to the face frame- maybe more depending on the drawer hardware you choose to use. Under mount drawer slides would be needed if you want to maximize your drawer width.

Can't really design this for you, just give you ideas.
 
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Old 01-01-17, 08:55 PM
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Here's an idea. Basically build a tall European cabinet with inset doors and/or drawer fronts.
The cabinet would line the inside of the niche.

I would use 3/4 or 1/2" plywood or melamine for the sides, top and bottom, and a fixed middle shelf. I would need to research the best hinge to use, but the door should open left 90░.

With 3/4" cabinet side panels, the rollouts could be about 12" wide. 12" is narrow but it's better than reaching in and looking for stuff.
A full extension undermount slide would be perfect, they only require 5/16" clearance at the sides vs 1/2" for side mount. Side panels also make the slides easier to install.
 
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Old 01-01-17, 09:11 PM
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Good question. I had thought about using drawer faces, or actually just one large drawer face that pulls out all the drawers inside. Nothing has been carved in stone but your comment reassures me that something can be worked out. I also like the idea of having a cabinet door on the top half and drawers on the bottom.

Can you explain the cleat for the left side face frame? I know what a cleat is but didn't think it wasn't used for the face frame.
 
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Old 01-01-17, 09:16 PM
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Thanks for the suggestion. I'm curious as to why I would need the additional 1/2" or 3/4" sides when there already is a "side" of drywall? I know it's more of a proper way of doing it but I'd like to stay away from reducing the width by that much, especially if some of the cabinet will have shelves only.
 
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Old 01-01-17, 09:41 PM
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You can attach the slides directly to the wall, squaring up and fastening will be much more difficult.
There are some tricks to aligning the slides that will come in after you make your plans.

There are also slides capable of sliding out the entire unit, like a pantry. Not sure if that applies here but check it out to get some ideas:

Heavy Duty Pantry Slides | Rockler Woodworking and Hardware
 
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Old 01-06-17, 09:22 PM
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Thanks for the suggestion. I am actually warming up to this idea. You can't see it in the picture but the bottom ~20" is about 34" deep and then it becomes 17" for the rest. Like I said this wasn't well planned and changed halfway through the project. So the bottom is definitely where I'm thinking of using a pull out pantry style, possibly smaller drawer boxes for some of the higher up ones as well. I'm looking at hardware and there are some drawer slides (side-mount) which are rated for up to 500 lbs. I'm not readily finding top-bottom style slides for such a deep system (like the Rockler one you linked). Any ideas? These things aren't cheap either. But I'm sure it's worth it once you have it all working.

The other thing I'm wondering as someone who has never built a cabinet: should this be built into two different cabinets or one big unit with an L-side shape, due to the deep bottom? I would probably be using pocket hole screws since I have one of those jigs. I know it's sacrilegious in many circles but whatever. A big unit would fit into the space but I'm just wondering what's the easiest.
 
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Old 01-07-17, 07:26 AM
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A Kreg Jig is perfect for joining face frames or butt joints, you have the right idea.
I agree the slides should be attached to a bottom platform, typically about 4" high.

Here's a link to some heavy duty slides, they are center mount:
34" Heavy Duty Pantry Slide, FR777, 7729

An option is to use the #500 slides, here's a link to bottom-mount brackets for those slides:
Accuride 9301 Mounting Brackets-Bottom Mount Brackets | Rockler Woodworking and Hardware

The brackets are $200.00 though, plus the cost of the slides.

Yet another option is to just use the 26" system from Rockler.
The pantry will not pull out past the face of the wall, but you will only be reaching back about 8".
 
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Old 01-07-17, 10:55 AM
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A kreg jig is worth every dime you spend on it. Only problem I have is I use it way to much.
 
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Old 01-07-17, 11:11 AM
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I'm curious as to why I would need the additional 1/2" or 3/4" sides when there already is a "side" of drywall?
My thought was, put 1 1/2" thick cleats horizontally on the left and 3/4" thick cleats horizontally on the right. Your 1 1/2" wide face frame covers up the face of those cleats on the left, and overlaps 3/4" over the cleats on the right. The cleats give you something to screw the drawer glides to... and to fasten the face frame to. And you need the 1 1/2" on the left to mount your cabinet door to and to get it and your drawer faces away from the wall on the left.

If you don't want to lose any room you need to forget about doors and drawers and just go with a bunch of open shelves.... or design some sort of California Closets style of closet organizer out of melamine.
 
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Old 03-20-18, 07:10 PM
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End result

I figured it would be nice to complete this thread by showing what I ended up doing. It took quite a while to have it finished. Pretty pleased with the amount of storage and use of available volume. The curious thing with the space was that the bottom 1/3 was deeper than the top 2/3. The bottom drawer is my laundry "basket". I found some long slides at a local building materials outlet for like $10. Very nice and I don't have to reach in more than a few inches to touch the end. The top drawers have slides that are a little too heavy-duty, and pretty tricky to get moving smoothly. I experimented with some powdered stains to color those top drawers, mostly for the fun of it. Some would question having the highest drawer as high as I put it, but it's my house and my drawer

Thanks for all the suggestions!
 
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Old 03-21-18, 03:41 AM
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Nice job. Did you use the pocket screws?
 
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