How to cut out vent hole in a hollow colonial door ?

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Old 07-18-18, 04:01 PM
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How to cut out vent hole in a hollow colonial door ?

Need to add a vent to a door for a furnace room .
tricky part is I dunno if I should put vent at bottum of door or where colonial design is ?

If I choose to cut the vent in the bottom section of the door should I use jig saw or circular saw ?
 

Last edited by wantboost; 07-18-18 at 04:22 PM.
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Old 07-18-18, 07:22 PM
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Number one, find two grille covers that are the right size and orientation to mount on each side of the door over the area you intend to cut out. Generally if it's a raised panel, you have to put the grill on the rails and stiles of the door (leaving a solid wood perimeter of at least 4") which limits you to cutting out the entire raised panel.

Once you have the grille you will have a better idea of where to cut. A skilsaw set to full depth, cut from one side... finish the corners with a jigsaw if needed. Cover the plate of the saw and door with masking tape so that you don't scratch it as you cut.

you don't want to cut out the very bottom 6-8" of the door.
 
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Old 07-18-18, 08:01 PM
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Good thing I ask I was about to cut into the bottum rail .
how about cutting into the panel ?
what do u think of tamarack vents ?
 
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Old 07-18-18, 08:52 PM
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Can you leave the door alone and install the vent in the adjacent wall? it would be easier and less noticeable.
 
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Old 07-19-18, 04:03 AM
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Is this just a non connected vent? In other words you're not going to have a pipe connected to it. I would do what Mad Scientist suggested. You can also buy louvered doors (usually bi-fold) and let run on a track.
 
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Old 07-19-18, 04:51 AM
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Is this a 6 panel or 2 panel door? I've painted quite a few 2 panel doors that had the grill in the panel.
 
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Old 07-19-18, 02:08 PM
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How big does it need to be is kinda important. I'm looking at a 6-panel colonial HC door right now and it sure looks like a 6" return vent would fit at the bottom w/o compromising the perimeter frame of the door. Have to actually have one in hand to know for sure.
 
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Old 07-19-18, 02:26 PM
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6"X 12? Return vent ?

6 panel door .

vent is not connected to anything it's just allowing fresh combustion are to enter the space .

what do u guys think of this?

http://tamtech.ca/tamarack-perfect-balance-in-door-return-air-pathway/
 
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Old 07-19-18, 02:31 PM
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The vent in your link doesn't look like it leaves enough structure at the bottom of the door.
Have you talked to your inspector? The houses I've painted with a vented door had a bigger vent than 6x12. I think the size was mandated by code.
 
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Old 07-19-18, 02:42 PM
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Generally if it's a raised panel, you have to put the grill on the rails and stiles of the door (leaving a solid wood perimeter of at least 4") which limits you to cutting out the entire raised panel.
in case you didn't understand what I was saying, you will need to cut out the bottom 2 raised panels... so your grilles will need to be 24x24 or 30x24 or something like that. They will lay flat on the perimeter of the door that way.

that's why I said figure out the size grill you need first... make sure you can get something that will cover .
 
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Old 07-19-18, 04:05 PM
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Exactly...need to know size required. Either NFA or CFM specs or similar. If it's for actual return air...unlikely 6 x 12 would be big enough, and you'd need to do as Xsleeper advises. If it's just for venting purposes (like for non-combustion fumes) the smaller might be ok. Since you said combustion air...there should be a spec listed. Seems odd to me I guess, taking heated air out of the house for combustion and exhausting it outside? Unless it's not in a conditioned space of course.

I used two 12 x 12 when I enclosed our water heater...one high, one low... just to ensure adequate combustion air and flue draw.
 
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Old 07-19-18, 04:09 PM
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Oh, Xsleeper....I've never seen a typical HC masonite type door with a 4" perimeter of solid wood...have you? Most are more like 1 1/2 -1 1/4 wood or HDF with cardboard or similar glued between the skins. Except the lock area of course.
 
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Old 07-19-18, 04:26 PM
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Doesn't matter if it's solid or not... he said it's a 6 panel door... so cut out 2 of the panels. The 4" perimeter is just the flat surface the grill needs to mount to. I.e. you can't cut a hole across "part" of the raised panel and have the grille floating in midair here and there. Well you could but it would look like crap.

he said it's hollow and I believe him. If he wants to plug the perimeter of the cutout he can.
 
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Old 07-19-18, 06:18 PM
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I think it would be better to cut each face (skin) of the door separately, using a saw with very little penetration.

It would be a good idea to glue thin strips of wood between the faces around the cut opening to hold the faces the proper distance from each other.

Choose louvers of a size so they fit completely on a flat part of the door face all the way around. Cut the hole a little smaller leaving a border of about an inch to go under the louver all the way around.

It might work better if you use bolts and nuts holding the louvers on both faces together as opposed to wood screws for each louver.

The Tamarack door linked to above is not easily built as DIY from an off the shelf hollow door. A new structural member would have to be fabricated (kitbashed) to go near the bottom of the door above the vent and between the two faces and between the two stiles.
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 07-19-18 at 06:56 PM. Reason: Merged double post
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Old 07-19-18, 07:13 PM
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It's a 2 panel door I just went and checked .

should I use a skill saw or jig saw ? How many teeth blade u recommend for each ?
u said if I do skil saw do one layer at a time ? How many layers is there.

its just needed for ventilation? I'm not sure the actual term . But the appliance need vents from other rooms !?!

what size panel do I need and how high off the ground should the vent be in a door and or a wall ?
 
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Old 07-20-18, 03:56 AM
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should I use a skill saw or jig saw ? How many teeth blade u recommend for each ?
u said if I do skil saw do one layer at a time ? How many layers is there
.

You can use either, if using a jig saw you'd need to drill a hole first to get started. IMO a skill saw would be easier [cutting one side at a time] You have the masonite skin on each side. For the most part it's hollow inside although there is a 'framework' made of cardboard that gives the masonite extra strength. Don't work about it, just make sure each side of the masonite is cut in the right place. The grille will hide any minor defects in your cuts.
 
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Old 07-20-18, 05:51 AM
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Alright I'll put the vent on the panel. Question Is how do I start the initial cut with a circular saw.
 
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Old 07-20-18, 05:57 AM
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Plunge cut.?..........................
 
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Old 07-20-18, 06:09 AM
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Thankyou. Can I do this with the door still mounted obviously closed . Or it's too awkward?
 
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Old 07-20-18, 06:14 AM
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You can but it's easier [safer too] to pull the hinge pins and set the door on a saw horse.
 
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Old 07-20-18, 06:14 AM
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All you have to do is pop the hinge pins out so I would definitely remove the door and lay it on a set of horses to cut it. Not that it probably couldn't be cut in place, but would take a pretty experienced set of hands.
 
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Old 07-20-18, 06:20 AM
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Ya I dont have saw horse that's why I was asking .
What else could I sit it on
 
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Old 07-20-18, 07:19 AM
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Sawhorses are a good investment for anyone inclined to do any work around their home, in my opinion, so now may be the time to make that investment, and folding ones do not take much space. But we've all gotten by with less under various circumstances, so, for example, a pair of 2x4's to give you blade clearance could be laid on a deck, driveway, or flat piece of real estate. Just make sure that it is stable before you start cutting, Not the ideal work height but a lot safer and easier than trying to cut it in place.
 
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Old 07-20-18, 10:25 AM
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You could even lay the door flat on the floor to make the cuts, just make sure your blade is set where it won't go thru to the other side. Drilling a small hole thru both sides in the corners is a good way to keep your measurements in the right place.
 
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