Using sander/deglosser ?

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Old 10-06-18, 08:02 PM
J
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Using sander/deglosser ?

Hey all,

I tried using Kleanstrip Sander Deglosser today on some cabinets (I think stained and varnished rather than painted) and didn't really notice them get deglossed - some parts were stripped off but most not. The cabinets appear glossy still for the most part. I had to use a sander to get the finish off them.

Is the sander/deglosser supposed to take care of this?

My plan is to prime and paint these.
 
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Old 10-06-18, 10:25 PM
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Many regard deglosser as little more than a cleaner and not a substitute for sanding or stripping the finish.
 
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Old 10-06-18, 10:59 PM
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Haha now I understand why. Maybe I should just go get some Jasco stripper. Do I really need to in this case though? I've already started sanding down the cabinets and am wondering if that's enough if I plan on priming it (Zinsser BIN) before painting w/ BM Advance.
 
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Old 10-06-18, 11:15 PM
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Take a look in the list of threads in the painting sub-forum, I think we have a sticky titled something like, "The ultimate cabinet repaint" which would be a good place to start.
 
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Old 10-07-18, 03:13 AM
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Liquid deglossers are for stripping a finish but rather for softening up the old finish to help the new finish adhere better. They also help clean the existing paint. Liquid deglossers also have a short window as sometime after the deglosser has evaporated the old paint/poly will start to harden back up.

You don't have to strip the existing finish to paint. Basically a light cleaning and sanding followed by a coat of a solvent based primer is sufficient. I generally wipe the old finish down with deglosser to both soften the poly and remove any sanding dust.
Here is the link to the thread SS referenced - https://www.doityourself.com/forum/p...t-repaint.html
 
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Old 10-07-18, 11:04 AM
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Dang, I kinda went overboard with the 60-80grit sanding I did then lol. Seems like the main factor here is making sure the primer is sufficiently adhering and coating as the new 'base' on the cabinets. At this point, since I've rough sanded the cabinets, I'm thinking it might be good just to go over them again with a finer grit (maybe 180?) *before* priming - should I take the time to do that?

As far as the liquid deglosser, how soon after applying it are you supposed to actually start priming then? Or what is the "window" of time/opportunity before it hardens back up?
 
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Old 10-07-18, 11:20 AM
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You want the deglosser to evaporate [no longer be wet on the surface] before you start painting or priming. The old paint will slowly harden back up but you have an hour or two [maybe more] to work with.

If you have visible sanding scratches I'd resand with 120 grit.
 
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Old 10-07-18, 11:32 AM
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If you sanded with 60-80 you may have put scratches in them that could show through the finish. You would not jump to 180, you would use 100-120 next.

The instructions on the side of your deglosser should tell you exactly what to do.
 
 

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