Converted Carport Repairs


  #1  
Old 10-02-22, 02:53 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2022
Posts: 2
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Converted Carport Repairs

Good afternoon,

I am a reluctanat, as-needed DIY'er, so my experience is limited. I inherited this nightmare from the previous owners and have had very few contractors interested in helping me resolve these issues. There are two main issues.
  1. The flat roof next to the pitched roof has caused an excessive amount of water to both roll off of the roof & to pool on top of the roof. I have had a variety of issues from the ceiling caving in to a recurrence of termites. My idea to correct this issue is to only have the slope in one direction (away from the flat roof), but I have had so much trouble finding a roofer who has a framer on staff or a carpenter to reframe the roof. The last roof pic shows the one-sided roof that I was hoping to achieve.
  2. The entire structure is a converted carport/garage. There seems to be quite a few issues with the structure. It's roughly 12" below the rest of my house & my deck out back, so it keeps getting flooded. I'm suspecting that the flooding is coming from standing water under the deck, but I have no guess as to how the termites are getting in. I have been treating the exterior walls (in the accessible parts of the yard & have not seen any tunnels). I have also drilled holes in the walls to spray pesticide inside the walls. Now, for the 2nd time, the termites have gotten to it.
My questions:
  1. Is the one-sided roof a good idea? If so, are there any other considerations that need to be taken into account if I go that route? None of the contractors have recommended gutters or anything else to account for the change in the flow of the water.
  2. Would it be a waste to get this structure elevated & then repair the termite damage? I have had some contractors recommend tear it down & rebuild, but I don't want to be without one of these rooms for months or a year (I really can't). Currently, the termite damage is the wall that the doors share & the room on the right.
  3. If the termites have eaten the wall and frame around the doors, is there a temporary solution for securing the doors? I had one contractor tell me that he could put in a 2x4, but I don't see what he would be nailing it n2. Even the header looks like it may have been compromised, so I have my doubts about what I'm being told. I don't want to be on the hook for demo to this guy & then be without both rooms for some reason. If it is possible, I would be willing to do so until I make a decision.
Any help would be greatly appreciated. I'm so overwhelmed!!!







 
  #2  
Old 03-26-23, 05:01 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2022
Posts: 2
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Hello,
I'm hoping to resurrect this post as no one replied, and my termite damage has now become possibly dangerous. The door frame and headers are now like paper. I want to rebuild them, so that I can at least lock my doors and make the area sound until I find a professional to redesign the room. The 2x4 that creates the frame is touching the concrete slab. I had read that that's not correct. What should go under that 2x4 in order to make these boards less desirable to termites? Is this a useless task, considering how low the entire structure is? Is there anything else I can do to prevent the termites from coming back over & over again? I hope someone tries to help this time.
 
  #3  
Old 03-26-23, 05:28 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,198
Received 1,947 Upvotes on 1,747 Posts
It's not clear at all from your photos what you're talking about... or how photos 1 and 2 relate to photo 3. You know, but we don't. Probably explains the lack of replies.

It's doubtful that any of the structure in the rest of the photos is on any sort of footing, so it's no suprise that no one wants to touch it. You don't ever build things on a slab thats poured on top of the ground unless you're so far south that you can see Mexico. That's why they are recommending you tear it down and rebuild it. Time wise, you can't remodel something that is in that poor of shape, and that was built incorrectly in the first place. Add termites to the mix and you really just need to start over.

Another reason you don't build on a slab is that the floor inside and the slab outside will be the same level... no good way to keep water out. Concrete outside a building must be lower and slope away from the building. And its a good practice to put a row of concrete blocks on a slab to keep the framing and siding elevated at least 6" above grade... which is usually required by code (or by siding mfg's) in most places.

...and hopefully you've had the termites taken care of with a ground treatment around the perimeter of your home. They need to drill through concrete (where needed) and inject insecticide in order to create a barrier from new infestations.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: