Cleaning camp cabins for painting

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Old 09-13-18, 02:16 PM
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Cleaning camp cabins for painting

I need advice for preparing a lot of small camp cabins for painting. The cabins are all wood with screened windows and canvas window covers. Framing is mostly 2x4 and 2x6, with some plywood panels. Floors are like wood decking.

We need to do a lot of these so looking for advice on an efficient way to do it.

Can we use a pressure washer? Some in my advising group think that would leave a wet mess that won't dry for a long time. They suggest using a blower instead of pressure washer. I think we can plan to allow time for pressure washing to dry out and washing might be more effective and less work. I think we are likely to need to wash the surfaces anyhow; they have a dark stained finish many years old with dusty grime. We could do a sweep and blow out, then apply soapy water with a brush, then use pressure washer to rinse, maybe blowing out again at the end to get rid of any standing water.

Will appreciate any thoughts, thanks.

Next question: painting, we are doing this to lighten up the inside of the cabins, and I think we can get by with a coat or maybe two of sprayed of thinned paint. Any thoughts about that one for bonus points? We don't have a lot of money or volunteer labor time! Spray or brush? And what kind of paint?

Charlie
 
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Old 09-13-18, 03:20 PM
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While I agree with pressure washing the exterior,I would not pressure wash the interior. How dirty is the interior? Usually all you need inside is a light washing, rinse and/or sweep.

Generally it isn't a great idea to thin paint.Spraying doesn't always work well on finished interiors.A lot depends on how much stuff needs to be protected from over spray [lights,switches,plug ins,windows,etc] What type of finish [and it's condition] determines what is best to apply over it.

Pics would give us a better idea of what you are dealing with.
 
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Old 09-13-18, 04:36 PM
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Cabin pic

Thanks for the reply Marksr. I have attached a photo of one of the older cabins; they are rough and interior is similar in materials to siding of exterior; there is open venting at the top of the cabins. Our objective is not an interior finish qualify of work but just to lighten the interior.

There is screening and we would want to avoid overspray getting on the screens. Otherwise inside, we would cover the floor to paint, and not worry too much about the rest as we'd like to lighten all of the other wood. Floor is wood plank with gaps, like a deck. I'd agree with a conclusion about not pressure washing interior if it were not essentially like a rough decking and siding as you might find in an old camp screen porch.
 
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Old 09-14-18, 03:25 AM
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Since you are asking about painting the interior a few pics of inside would be helpful.
 
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Old 09-14-18, 07:04 AM
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Here is the only one I've got now. It is representative enough; you can see the ceiling outside the screen on the other photo, it is the same inside.

Thanks !
 
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Old 09-14-18, 08:23 AM
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I will gladly defer to Mark or anyone else who is wiser in this area, but my mind would be leaning toward long handle brushes and Spic and Span, TSP, or something along that line, both inside and out. As far as pressure washing, I'm seeing terrain that would make it more difficult to maneuver high pressure hoses, open eaves and any number of potentially loose boards and other points of entry to force water into where it will take way too long to dry, and a lot of tall trees that will stretch the dry time even on wide open surfaces. I'm sure that you want a good job when it's all done, but you're probably not shooting for front page in Better Homes and Gardens, so every inch of every surface gets hit with a brush, enough scrubbing to get dirt and mildew off, a little extra for the bug nests, bird droppings, or whatever, rinse it off, and I would imagine it would dry relatively fast that way. Buckets, brushes, and handles, however many ladders you need and can muster for the more adventuresome volunteers to do the higher work on the outsides, and a few step ladders and/or portable work platforms for those not so fond of heights to reach any troublesome areas inside. That way you can keep as many people as show up busy, and perhaps maintain a little more control on how much water you use and where it ends up.
 
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Old 09-14-18, 10:06 AM
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If you want to use a light colored paint you'll need to use an oil base primer first. Otherwise the light colored finish paint is apt to discolor here and there.

TSP is a great detergent but must be rinsed well or it's residue can present adhesion issues.
 
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