Outfitting a deep pantry

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-07-16, 04:01 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 346
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Outfitting a deep pantry

Name:  pantry .jpg
Views: 596
Size:  36.6 KB

I've posted before about an idea for this, but am looking for other suggestions. I have a 60wx39d pantry and would like to fully utilize the space for storage. I attached a picture to get an idea. Note there is a bump out in the back for the dryer venting.



The main issue is the shelf size: 60x39. I was considering using 2x4s and plywood, but am concerned about eating up too much of the space with the 3.5" height of the 2x4s. I was going to make a frame attached to the studs of 2x4 (everything painted white) with a 2x4 going across the width in the middle. Plywood would be the shelving attached to the 2x4 frame.

I could stack the washer and dryer (they sell a stacking kit), but prefer to keep the countertop.

I would also like to have a pull-out rack for hanging clothes to dry. The shelves should be very sturdy to handle heavy things like a stand mixer and dishes.

Any ideas appreciated.

Notes: Ceiling is over 9'. I know that stuff at the back of these deep shelves will be hard to access, but it is for little used items.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-08-16, 05:13 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,730
Received 625 Votes on 578 Posts
You could visit a steel fabricator or welding shop and get angle or square tubing to act as your shelf cross supports. They would be much thinner than 2x4's and the shop could cut them to the required length. You could cut holes or notches in wood on the side walls to hold the steel like a closet clothes rod.
 
  #3  
Old 09-08-16, 05:29 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,650
Received 319 Votes on 283 Posts
If wanting to stay with wood, you could use 1x4s instead of 2x4s for the cleats .... and you'll need a support bracket at the midway point for shelves that long.
 
  #4  
Old 09-08-16, 08:49 AM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,451
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Dane's idea of supporting the span with steel is a good one.

Here's a pic of the steel we use to support granite overhangs, it's available at any metal mart.

Name:  rectangle-steel-tube.jpg
Views: 196
Size:  12.4 KB

All you need is a 1x4 attached to the back wall for each shelf.
Your side 1x4's will be notched at the top to accept the steel. You can notch about 2/3 from the rear, or closer to the front.

If you can't find enough studs to support your side members (find at least one), there are special anchors that can hold 300 pounds in drywall.
 

Last edited by Handyone; 09-08-16 at 09:11 AM. Reason: Steel is 3/4 x 1-1/2"
  #5  
Old 09-08-16, 02:32 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Just a thought, remove the Sheetrock on the walls and replace with " AC plywood. If you feel the plywood will not be adequate for support brackets you can extra stud dead center while the wall is open. I'd consider installing shelf standards to the plywood to provide adjustable shelves. Maybe side standards and a back standard down the center of the back.
 
  #6  
Old 09-28-16, 12:22 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 346
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I talked to my Father. He is extremely handy. We came up with this idea. 2x2 cleat on the walls for each shelf. 2 threaded rods hanging from the ceiling truss. One toward the front of the shelves and one toward the middle of the shelves (both centered width wise) . A bolt, washer, the shelf, another washer and bolt on the rod (going through each shelf) to give additional support.

The shelves would still be 3/4" plywood with some kind of decorative trim on the front.

Thoughts on this idea?
 
  #7  
Old 09-28-16, 12:35 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,730
Received 625 Votes on 578 Posts
You mentioned "truss". Engineered trusses should not be drilled. You could get up in the attic and lay a board across the trusses and attach your threaded rod to it.

Just be prepared for the headache of getting the whole contraption assembled. The shelves cannot be slid in place while the threaded rod is hanging down so the shelves will have to go in first. Then drop the threaded rod down and install your nuts and washers and do a lot of nut turning.
 
  #8  
Old 09-28-16, 12:38 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,575
Received 94 Votes on 83 Posts
I'd put a cleat on the back and skip one of the rods. Additionally, top down on the rod, I'd have the shelf, a washer and then two nuts locked together.

That said, I'm not sure I'd do the rod in the first place but I haven't thought about it much.
 
  #9  
Old 09-28-16, 12:40 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 346
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You mentioned "truss". Engineered trusses should not be drilled. You could get up in the attic and lay a board across the trusses and attach your threaded rod to it.

Just be prepared for the headache of getting the whole contraption assembled. The shelves cannot be slid in place while the threaded rod is hanging down so the shelves will have to go in first. Then drop the threaded rod down and install your nuts and washers and do a lot of nut turning.
Since it is unlikely there is a truss in the right location, I was thinking to Put a 2x4 on the ceiling spanning two trusses and screw it into the trusses and attach the rod to that.

Yes, I do think assembly will be tricky.

The other options seem too bulky. If I could find steel to use for support easily, that seems viable also.
 
  #10  
Old 09-28-16, 12:45 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 346
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You mentioned "truss". Engineered trusses should not be drilled. You could get up in the attic and lay a board across the trusses and attach your threaded rod to it.

Just be prepared for the headache of getting the whole contraption assembled. The shelves cannot be slid in place while the threaded rod is hanging down so the shelves will have to go in first. Then drop the threaded rod down and install your nuts and washers and do a lot of nut turning.
I like this idea, but have no idea what size steel I would need or what gauge. Does it need to be a rectangle or can it be a thick steel bar?
 
  #11  
Old 09-28-16, 01:00 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,451
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I like the threaded rod option. I posted this technique in your previous thread:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ca...ml#post2557687

As SS said, use your cleat on the back wall, no rod. I would use a 1x2 rather than 2x2. The 1x2 can be attached more securely to the wall.
The single rod will be used only to support the front center of each shelf. The hanger board needs to sit on top of the trusses as mentioned.

Assembly will be a little difficult but worth it IMO. I would use nuts and fender washers at the bottom of every shelf.
 
  #12  
Old 09-28-16, 02:18 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 346
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Handyone
I like the threaded rod option. I posted this technique in your previous thread:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/cl...ml#post2557687

As SS said, use your cleat on the back wall, no rod. I would use a 1x2 rather than 2x2. The 1x2 can be attached more securely to the wall.
The single rod will be used only to support the front center of each shelf. The hanger board needs to sit on top of the trusses as mentioned.

Assembly will be a little difficult but worth it IMO. I would use nuts and fender washers at the bottom of every shelf.
So you think a 38" span is okay for the depth with just the front middle supported with a rod?

Any idea what size rod to use? It looks like 1/2" is easily available.

1x2s are pretty skimpy. 65"x38" is around a 17 sq foot shelf. If you figure 8 pounds per sq ft max, that would be around 136 pounds per shelf. I guess the weight is distributed around all cleats, so maybe that is sufficient.
 
  #13  
Old 09-28-16, 03:29 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,451
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The main concern is a 65" wide shelf will sag in the front middle. The back and side cleats will support a lot of weight so that's no problem.
I would use 1x3 poplar for the cleats, poplar is strong and paints very well.

A 1/2" rod is more than strong enough. Normally wide "cabinet" shelves (48") are only supported by a shelf pin inserted into a middle stile.

The shelf pins are strong enough in most cases and you will be way above that.
 
  #14  
Old 09-30-16, 08:12 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 346
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If I used 2x12s for the shelves, would I need support in the middle? I'd butt them and fasten them to the wall cleat. This would be more expensive, but easier. I am going to have a lot of waste using 4x8 sheets of plywood anyway.
 
  #15  
Old 09-30-16, 08:42 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,730
Received 625 Votes on 578 Posts
I have 2x12" shelves in my warehouse carrying a moderate load. They span 72" and after about 10 years of use still don't have a sag. They appear to be yellow pine.
 
  #16  
Old 09-30-16, 08:51 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 346
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have 2x12" shelves in my warehouse carrying a moderate load. They span 72" and after about 10 years of use still don't have a sag. They appear to be yellow pine.
Thanks. Sounds like it would work then.

Even though it will be more $$$$, it will save me a lot of hassle. I don't have a vehicle to get 4x8 sheets of plywood home and I would need help getting them on the table saw and installing them. 2x12s I can cut with a chop saw myself and get them home in my car.
 
  #17  
Old 10-27-16, 09:45 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 346
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm getting ready to do this with 2x12s. My one concern is that the boards that make up a shelf won't line up. Of course, I will try to pick straight boards and put the crowns the same way, but what kind of variation can I expect? Will items be lopsided if they are sitting across 2 boards or will the difference be insignificant?
 
  #18  
Old 10-27-16, 11:07 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,650
Received 319 Votes on 283 Posts
Just to make sure I understand, you'll be putting two 2x12's side by side to make a shelf 23" wide?
If so, any differences should be insignificant. If you do wind up with one being higher/lower than the other you could always screw a board spanning both 2x12s under them to correct the discrepancy.
 
  #19  
Old 10-27-16, 11:12 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 346
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Just to make sure I understand, you'll be putting two 2x12's side by side to make a shelf 23" wide?
If so, any differences should be insignificant. If you do wind up with one being higher/lower than the other you could always screw a board spanning both 2x12s under them to correct the discrepancy.
Correct. In some cases 3 boards to make a 34.5" deep shelf.
 
  #20  
Old 10-27-16, 11:16 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 9,029
Received 74 Votes on 67 Posts
Have not gotten into this but 2 subjection, 1 Make sure the washer and dryer can come out fairly easy or may charge more for repairs or not do them. I repaired washers for years and have run into this many times. 2nd I have deep pantry but they are cabinets. I hate deep shelves as the things in back just get lost. I but drawers in my cabinets and the top drawer I put Plexiglas on bottom of drawer so you can see what is in them. My wife is short and can't see over the edge.
 
  #21  
Old 11-03-16, 09:34 AM
E
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I don't know if it's too late to help at all or not, but I remember at my dad's old house we went over to help him set up his giant walk-in pantry, and we wound up installing a couple of those rail-type shelves that people use in closets to save space and add stability. I don't think this is the exact place we got them from, but they look something like this: ********
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 11-03-16 at 10:05 AM. Reason: Advertising not allowed. Link removed.
  #22  
Old 11-20-16, 01:37 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 346
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks to those that chimed in. Thought I'd post a pic of the final product.

The 2x12's worked great. It may be slightly overkill, but I don't need to worry about sagging. It cost around $100 not counting the paint which I already had.

Name:  IMG_20161120_145517.jpg
Views: 214
Size:  26.5 KB
 
  #23  
Old 11-20-16, 02:39 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,730
Received 625 Votes on 578 Posts
Wow, and it looks nice! Good job.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: