Comcast's internet install - no face plate and hanging cable, hole in drywall


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Old 05-05-17, 12:28 AM
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Comcast's internet install - no face plate and hanging cable, hole in drywall

I have Comcast High Speed Internet installed a few months ago. Only noticed today with cold air blowing on my bare feet (and large cockroaches entering house through hole in drywall), what a horrible job they did. They put in a gang box into the drywall that connects to outside communcation box (for telephone,etc.). No insulation, no faceplate. Just a cut hole in drywall, a gangbox and loose cable coming out of the box. See pic. The space around the gangbox is open to outside so outside air blowing in and bugs entering easily.

So I went to Big Box store and bought a faceplace with coax plug already in it thinking I could stuff some insulation into and around the gangbox, screw entry cable to back of faceplace coax connector, screw faceplate to gangbox and then screw in coax from my desktop to this coax outlet.

The faceplate I bought didn't fit the gangbox in wall. The screw holes on the faceplace don't line up with the screw holes in gangbox. The new faceplate has screw holes further apart than this gray gangbox Comcast installed. So I return the faceplace and tried to find a faceplate that would work. All of the faceplates with coax outlet don't fit. Ok. Maybe I just pull out the Comcast gangbox and install a new one. None of the single blue "old work" gangboxes have screw holes that align with the coax faceplate.

What am I missing? I watched lots of videos on how to install an coax outlet. I just need to attach faceplate to wall over existing drywall hole. Nobody in videos seem to have any problem attaching faceplace to standard blue gangbox. This gray gangbox Comcast installed has the same screw spacing as the standard blue gangbox. So why don't the faceplate screws line up with the gangbox's?

What do I do to install a faceplate with some insulation over this hole in drywall?
 
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Old 05-05-17, 01:25 AM
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Coax outlet problem fix

I had cable TV from Comcast for a few months but cancelled. So checked out the coax outlet for CATV. Took off faceplate and it is true. The newer faceplates with coax connection on them ARE LARGER. This old faceplate from my CATV connection fit just fine. So I went up in the attic and got some of the blown in insulation to put in gangbox and around edges, put faceplate from my previous CATV connection in living room to my internet connection in office. Fit perfectly. See pic.

Now I have a big drywall hole in front room where TV is. Will need to find a blank faceplate the smaller size to cover that drywall hole. I can fell immediate difference. No cold air on my feet when sitting at my desktop computer. And no more 3" flying cockroaches sneaking in that gap.
 
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Old 05-05-17, 03:47 AM
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What does the outside look like? Where the cable enters? Cold air and cockroaches can't just "appear" inside a wall cavity. They need access. THAT is where your problem lies. You can buy a spanner to go across the box and install a blank cover in it if the holes don't match. I have never had a blank cover not fit the box directly, though.
 
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Old 05-05-17, 05:58 AM
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Besides, COMCAST should've been called to properly fix and finish the job. The fix should not have been on you. You should complain to Comcast.
 
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Old 05-05-17, 09:14 AM
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Comcast charges $50 every time they send anyone out except for installation. When they lay cable for connection they run an orange coax cable from entry point into house out to "green box" out by the street. This cable sits on top of your lawn until 2 weeks later a subcontractor comes with a little trenching tool to bury the cable. My box is in back of house so the orange cable ran all the way around my house, under the privacy fence by driveway and then all the way out to the street.

The first time they installed, I had horrible reception on my TV within a week. I called Comcast and they said "$50" for trip out. "No way, you just layed the cable." So technician comes out and discovers that they barely screwed the coax into the green box out at the street. So he screwed it up tight and everything was fine. A $50 charge showed up on my bill. I raised hell about that telling them the cable guy said I would not be charged because it was an installation issue.

A month later, the city dug up my neighbor's water meter (just 8 inches from green cable box). Suddenly no CATV and no internet. You guessed it. The city workers cut through the orange cable. So I call Comcast again and explain that the city cut through my Comcast cable while repairing neighbor's water meter. I expected them to fix at no cost to me. Instead of pulling up the old cable, they just laid a new orange cable from back of house all the way out to green box at street as before. Then the subcontractor comes and buries this new cable. Who knows how many inactive cables lurk just under the surface of my lawn. I already hit a black one sticking up with coax F plug on the end with the mower . I guess I should insist that Comcast come and dig up all their old cables out of my yard and install just one. That's not going to happen.

So here's the deal with connection to my house. I have an old Time Warner enclosure on other side of this wall next to AT&T's phone box. In the pic you will see the orange cable is attached to conduit with cable ties and up into Time Warner box. (The white cable goes to the AT&T box). I tried to open the Time Warner box to get a real look but couldn't get it open. Along with the orange cable, there is a black cable on the conduit (is that the one I hit with my mower?). Couldn't get a photo from underneath to show. But stuck my finger up the hole under there and it's about a 2x3 inch rectangular hole with conduit and these extra cables tied to it with zip ties going inside my wall via the Time Warner Box. Totally open to the outside. Nothing to block anything that can get in between conduit and cables in that wide open hole.

So the culprit is really the way Comcast is installing the cable into Time Warner box. No attempt to seal off the large opening where they are piggy-backing on the conduit. I suspect they just cut larger hole around conduit to get cable into wall. I don't know what is in that conduit but could be electrical.

So to keep bugs out of house, I need to seal off the big hole where conduit and cables enter in Time Warner box at the bottom. I am tempted to spray expanding foam but would be a real mess if they need change or install another new cable. So I guess I will stuff a bunch of filler up the hole to try to seal it up. Another suggestions.

BTW. There are the standard size faceplates 4.5" H x 2.75" W (old kind) and then these new faceplates measuring 6.4 x 4 x 1.5 inches where you can put multiple types of plugs in the faceplate. You install these using a low voltage mounting bracket.

BIG BOX STORES DO NOT SALE OR STOCK STANDARD SIZED FACEPLACES ANYMORE. I found one on Amazon to cover the hole in drywall in living room for CATV where I took the one there and installed in office for computer internet access.
 
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Old 05-05-17, 09:27 AM
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I'm not sure what the plate issue is. We do this everyday and I've never seen two different sizes of wall plates. Those single cut in rings are the same screw spacing as a single gang wall box.

The wiring thru the wall is not usually behind the demarc boxes. I see your fiber entering it along with several cables leaving it.

Sealing the entrance at the bottom of the box won't help.
You can open that gray box. There should be a plate saying "customer access" with a single screw that gets taken out. If the wires go thru the wall there.... you'll see them and the hole.
 
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Old 05-05-17, 09:44 AM
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You probably have big stock of old standard-sized faceplates. Not available at big box store anymore.
 
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Old 05-05-17, 11:50 AM
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I should have never listened to those telling me to open Time Warner Box,. Yes, I discovered a missing sealing grommet for cables entering the box. But couldn't get the box shut. At least 4 coax cables with F connectors attached to nothing. Then a bulky 1-in 2-out splitter and 3 short extensions to splitter. Total mess with unused coax with F connectors filling the box.

I only have cable modem in office and no cable TV. One of the outs on splitter is for cable modem and the other is for CATV, correct? Can I remove the splitter and direct connect Comcast orange input cable to cable modem coax into office? Or must I maintain split to TV?
 
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Old 05-05-17, 12:09 PM
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You can probably remove the splitter to gain room. Try it.... you won't damage anything.
If you remove the splitter.... you'll need a dual female F connector/joiner.

That box is not usually ever sealed on the bottom. You need to close the hole into the house.... not into that connection box.
 
 

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