Optimum VoIP - Phones off hook after thunderstorm

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-23-19, 08:03 AM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 21
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Optimum VoIP - Phones off hook after thunderstorm

Background info:
Using optimum VoIP.
Cable modem on 2nd floor has always been hooked up to a telephone jack and that enabled every other jack in the house with a telephone signal.

There was a storm recently and it fried my cable modem as well as the cordless phone hooked up to a telephone jack on the ground floor. Now none of the phone jacks in the house work. The only way I have phone service is by plugging my new cordless phone system directly into the modem.

Is the issue at the box outside? Or could it be a jack in the house? I think they were daisy-chained together.

Do you see a short anywhere? I'm confused on why different colored wires are connected together. I thought you were supposed to connect red to red, green to green, etc. Any help is appreciated!

Name:  phone - Copy.jpg
Views: 106
Size:  256.5 KB
 

Last edited by PJmax; 11-23-19 at 09:49 AM. Reason: resized/labeled picture
  #2  
Old 11-23-19, 09:28 AM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 21
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I just connected the modem to the jack and then tested every jack in the house with a phone line tester. Each one has power, so that's good. Some gave me a "line reversed" warning. If the jacks have power, what could be causing the phone to be off the hook?
 
  #3  
Old 11-23-19, 09:56 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 60,824
Received 1,330 Votes on 1,229 Posts
If you are getting a line reversed warning...... the line should be ok. A shorted line will give no reading.

I labeled your picture. the aerial wire is the original feed from the phone company. That is that blue/blue-white pair. It is probably dead. The cable company tapped in there as it was the easiest point to attach to all wiring in the house. Some of the installers are smart and realize you can power any jack in the house and they will all power up. All that gets done is to disconnect the house from the old phone company feed.

Originally..... red, green, yellow and black were the only colors used for phone service. With more then two lines.... more colors were needed. Much of the wiring is now in UTP 8 conductor/4 pair wiring. Blue-blue/white, orange-orange/white, green-green/white and brown-brown/white. Typically the red and green as well as the blue-blue/white are used for the first line.

I don't visually see any shorts. It is possible that there is a burn in the house wiring that is creating a partial short. It's easy to happen as the wiring is closely twisted. A meter would make things easier.

You could also open the splice outside and connect one pair at a time back together to see which ones causes the problem. Pull the wires out, fan them so that the picture you take sees all the splices clearly and take another picture.
 
  #4  
Old 11-23-19, 10:23 AM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 21
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for the guidance. I just went through and tested continuity at each phone jack in the house. All of the jacks gave me infinite resistance except for the main jack where the modem hooks up the phone line.

I undid the wiring in the jack and then tested continuity again to rule out a faulty jack and I still saw a short circuit. So I think the problem is indeed at the box outside. I'm going to do some testing with the meter now and see if I can find the short. I'll report back shortly.
 
  #5  
Old 11-23-19, 10:27 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 60,824
Received 1,330 Votes on 1,229 Posts
You should be measuring the same short everywhere in the wiring as it's all tied together.
You will need to open the splice outside and check each cable to find out which one is the problem.
 
  #6  
Old 11-23-19, 11:38 AM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 21
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I got the phone jack by the modem working again! I undid some of the splicing and was able to find out which pair was shorting. By removing that highlighted green wire, the short was gone and the phone line is no longer off the hook. But now a few jacks in the house don't work.

I am stumped where that wire could be shorting though. I undid the wires at one jack and found a short, but they look fine. Would that mean the short is somewhere along a wire run inside the walls? Wouldn't it be pretty rare for wire to short anywhere other than at a junction point?
 
Attached Images  
  #7  
Old 11-23-19, 11:50 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 60,824
Received 1,330 Votes on 1,229 Posts
Try to identify the cables as you are testing. This will make it easier in the future if there are other problems.

The good thing about multiwire cables is that there are spare wires. In the cable that shows a short on the pair...... pick a different pair to use. Remember..... what ever you switch to outside.... you'll need to switch at the jack where the cable goes to.
 
  #8  
Old 11-23-19, 12:05 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 21
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Great idea! I will test continuity on other pairs tomorrow and see if I can swap.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: