Using Router to Share Static IP

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Old 07-11-16, 10:47 AM
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Using Router to Share Static IP

I have a small office, and internet is provided by the building manager. I was given one static IP address. I noticed that the other tenants all have routers, which I assume allows them to connect other devices. Can someone explain how I would configure a router, so I can connect my other peripherals? I assume that I set a static IP within the interface. I am confused about the DHCP settings. I don't want to interfere with the building's network or other tenants. I appreciate any suggestions.
 
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Old 07-11-16, 11:06 AM
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You would configure the router to use the static IP you were assigned for it's network port. Then you configure the DHCP server in the router to supply dynamic IP addresses to your devices.

I assume your devices will be wireless (so you would need a wireless router). Ideally your would choose your wireless channel to avoid conflict with other wireless networks near by. You also need to configure the security type and set up your devices to use the same security settings.

If it's to be a wired network then interference with other tenants wont be an issue.
 
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Old 07-11-16, 11:26 AM
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Thank you very much for your help. This is a dumb question, but how does my router know not to assign an IP address to other users? Is it even possible for that to happen?
 
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Old 07-11-16, 01:15 PM
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That's where the security setup comes into play. Anyone with a wireless device can attempt to connect to your router, but unless they have the security code the router won't allow the connection.

Like when you try to connect at your local starbucks: You may see networks for other businesses listed on your connection screen, but they will show a lock symbol indicating you need the passcode to connect.
 
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Old 07-11-16, 01:28 PM
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Thanks. I was actually referring to hardwired connections. How do I isolate my router, so that it doesn't assign an IP to someone else? I want to make sure that it only assigns an IP to my devices.
 
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Old 07-11-16, 01:43 PM
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A typical router has a modem/internet port and then, typically, 4 ports for your network. The router does the job of keeping people out from your network by only allowing traffic that you specify to flow between the internet port and your network ports. No one on the internet side of the router will be given an IP address from your router. For those people on your network side of the router, you can manage the hard wired connections in a couple of ways. You can make sure that the only wires you connect to your router physical end at a computer you trust. for an extra layer of protection, each network adapter in a computer (or any networked device) has a unique code. You can put those codes into your router so that only that list of network adapters can receive an IP address from your router.

Post back if you need more info.

- Peter
 
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Old 07-11-16, 05:23 PM
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cai24, you didn't say if the static IP was external or internal. Something tells me that the building didn't pay for external IPs for each tenant. I hope that he's not sniffing the traffic.
 
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Old 07-11-16, 08:21 PM
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cai24, you didn't say if the static IP was external or internal. Something tells me that the building didn't pay for external IPs for each tenant. I hope that he's not sniffing the traffic.
I'm pretty sure that it's an internal IP. If I remember correctly, it's in the 10.x.x.x format. Do you think that's a bad thing? I wonder if I should look into getting my own internet service.
 
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Old 07-11-16, 08:34 PM
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Yes... the 10.x.x.x is an address from a local router.

It's fairly common for a small business owner to allow other businesses to use their internet connection. I have never run into a problem with traffic sniffing.

Only you can answer the question if you feel the owner would do that.
 
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Old 07-12-16, 04:24 AM
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Only you can answer the question if you feel the owner would do that.
Just the owner? Anyone on the network could be curious! If I were on a network like that, the first thing that I would do is put the IP of the router in a browser, to see if it still had the default login. If it's the 10.x.x.x subnet, try 10.0.0.1

Aside from that, make sure that all the devices are password protected & change the permissions, on shared folders. You can see who is sharing what just by running \\10.x.x.x in the run box of your own PC. Change the last # of IP address each time. Example: 10.0.0.2 up to 10.0.0.254 Adjust the IP address to fit the subnet that is being used.

When I was living in the same house with my brother, I made his shared printer print something. It said "I'm watching you". He came running down the stairs.
 
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Old 07-12-16, 04:39 PM
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If the building owner is smart enough to assign static IP's.... he's not going to leave a default admin password in place for a router.
 
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Old 07-12-16, 04:49 PM
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If the building owner is smart enough to assign static IP's.... he's not going to leave a default admin password in place for a router.
Does that mean that he shouldn't look? I've seen smart people overlook simple things. If that were overlooked, it would sure tell him a lot.
 
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Old 07-13-16, 02:03 PM
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Make sure that your router does not use the same IP address range as the static address that you are given. The first "10" will match but after that you can setup a different range by changing either or both of the next 2 sets of numbers. Don't worry about the last set as that range with be from 0 to 255 to account for each device on your network.

You can also look around your network by using the "ping" command from a command prompt. You type "ping 10.x.x.x" where you change the "x" to the a number you think exists on the network. If you get a response, then you can see that computer and they might be able to see you. not good. Obviously, don't worry about addresses that your router is providing.



- Peter
 
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Old 07-13-16, 03:36 PM
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I thought of 2 ways to create a network using that internal static IP. If it's a wired connection, set your router's gateway to the 10.x.x.x address that was given to you. Then use a 192.168.1.xxx for your other devices.

If you connect to his router wirelessly, buy an Amped 2400. That takes the wireless connection & changes it to wired connections. It's opposite of what a router does.
 
 

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