In need of more hardwired ethernet ports

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  #1  
Old 04-16-17, 02:53 PM
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In need of more hardwired ethernet ports

I'm in need of more hardwired ethernet ports.

Currently using an Archer C9 AC1900 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Router
Normal array of tablets, PC, and phones using WIFI

Current hardwired devices
- smart TV (in same cabinet as router)
- file server (in same cabinet as router)
- VOIP phone adapter (in same cabinet as router)
- to desktop PC (In another room)

Desired hardwired configuration at the Archer router
- smart TV (in same cabinet as router)
- VOIP phone adapter (in same cabinet as router)
- Android TV box at the TV
- Ethernet wire to other room

In the other room
- moved file server (was getting too hot in original cabinet anyway)
- Desktop PC
- Another android device

My requirement is to use hardwired Ethernet on all devices that have a fixed stationary location even if the device has WIFI capability.

I'm thinking of using a retired router (ASUS RT-N13U) in the other room to add the additional hardwired Ethernet capabilty. This router has a 3 way switch for either router, repeater, or AP mode.

It appears that both repeater and AP modes work.

Which should be best? Pros and cons of the selection? Or should I purchase a switch?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-16-17, 03:04 PM
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A router can be used as a hardwired switch if you disable DHCP. If you need more ports that what it provides, buy a switch that will give you all the ports that you need.
 
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Old 04-16-17, 04:39 PM
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According to the specs, the ports on that router are only 10baseT. Probably not optimal for a file server, but you could try it and see if performance is an issue as it will depend on your application.

If it's a bottleneck, buy a switch.
 
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Old 04-17-17, 03:14 AM
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Thanks for the feedback. Speed is not a critical factor for the server since it's mainly used for backups. However, I see I can get a 5-port 10/100 switch for $10 so it looks like a switch is the way to go.
 
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Old 04-17-17, 06:09 AM
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I think the Asus specs are a typo, elsewhere it's listed as 10/100.
So, not gigabit, but should be fast enough for most uses.

Originally Posted by https://www.cnet.com/au/products/asus-rt-n13u-wireless-n-router-with-all-in-one-printer-server/review/
The back of the router houses four standard 10/100 Ethernet ports, one inbound Ethernet port and a single USB 2.0 port.
 
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Old 04-17-17, 07:43 AM
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I can get a 5-port 10/100 switch for $10 so it looks like a switch is the way to go.
You can't beat that price.
 

Last edited by donoli2016; 04-17-17 at 08:51 AM.
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Old 04-17-17, 09:44 AM
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dont know your speeds but its nice to have gig capibilitys.

When I was upgraded to 100 mbs internet I could not attain those speeds anywherein the home. You need gig network cards.

The few that I have in the home still could not attain the 100 mbs speeds as there is always a bottle neck.

My bottle neck was the first wireless router I have. I use a second as an access point in the kids room upstairs and it allows them the hard wire their game consoles for better through put..

This first router was a 10/100. Even though it stated 10/100 my computers did not reach that speed. I upgraded to a 10.100.1000 unit and all are happy in the home...

Moral: Upgrade what you can from start to be ready for technology advancements IMO..

 
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Old 04-18-17, 09:05 AM
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If I’m not mistaken it does appear that a bottleneck will be created using a 5-port 10/100 switch (post 4). (Or maybe that was already obvious to everyone and already settled).

Your Archer includes Gigabit LAN ports which will be throttled by the new 10/100 switch. However, for all practical purposes it may not matter. But taking into consideration what Mike just said…it appears you might be able to get a 5-port Gigabit switch anywhere from 20 to around 50 bucks – a lot more than the $10.

Decisions decisions – LOL!!!!
 
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Old 04-20-17, 05:34 AM
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I just saw a Gigabit 8 port switch for $15.

I can still remember the 3 Megabit Ethernet at work I thought was more than adequate.
 
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Old 04-20-17, 01:33 PM
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I guess when you consider our internet connection isn’t anywhere near Gigabit speed, and the disk-to/from-(internal) buffer speed is also nowhere near Gigabit speed, probably the excess capacity goes to waste for the average home user. But still, it only costs just a little more and then we’re ready for the big jumps in the future (LOL)!

I think Mike's point is very valid, good to remember when you shop .Although I'm guilty of forgetting that myself sometimes.
 
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Old 04-20-17, 06:24 PM
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and the disk-to/from-(internal) buffer speed is also nowhere near Gigabit speed
You're sorta right about writes (lol).. The slowest consumer drives (green/eco type) can write from buffer to disk at about 500Mbps. Some enterprise drives can write 1.2Gbps. However the buffer is much faster, and can cache data at up to 6Gbps. Read speeds are even faster (most network disk activity is WORM - Write Once Read Many), so the slower write speed is only a factor when say a movie is transferred to a NAS. If it is later copied back over the network to another computer it will be at a higher speed (streaming is a different animal, it only streams at a little above the actual bitrate of the content, usually topping out around 25-50Mbps for ultra high quality rips).

And then there's SSD - today's mid-to-high end SSDs are so fast that the 6Gbps SATA3 interface bottlenecks them. Enter the 16Gbps m.2/PCIe SSD interface..
 
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Old 04-21-17, 05:32 PM
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Originally Posted by zoesdad
Your Archer includes Gigabit LAN ports which will be throttled by the new 10/100 switch.
Hmm, throttled how?
On a 15-75 meg internet connection it won't matter.
Streaming 4k video is "only" about 15-20 Mbps, doable with 100 Mbps ethernet.
Well, unless you have 2-3 people trying it at the same time.

Hook up the existing equipment, TRY IT, IT'S FREE.
See if you find any lag. If you do, then get the gigabit switch.
 
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Old 04-22-17, 08:07 AM
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In principle it would certainly be a bottleneck, but for all practical purpose it may not obtain, that’s why I did in fact say
for all practical purposes it may not matter.
But for the trivial amount of switch cost difference - remember harvx has indicated he wants to buy a switch - why put a bottleneck the system?
 
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