Processor Upgrage

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Old 09-12-17, 09:22 AM
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Processor Upgrage

I had a PC built by a local shop a couple years ago and I'm not happy with the performance of the CPU. My new PC is actually slower than the 10 year old PC it replaced. The new PC has a Gigabyte GA-H97-D3H motherboard with 1150 socket (http://www.gigabyte.us/Motherboard/GA-H97-D3H-rev-10#ov) and I believe my CPU is a Pentium G3240 or G3420. I'd like to upgrade to an intel i3 or and i5, if I can do so for around $200.
There are several variants of the i3 and i5 on the market, and I'm not sure which I should get. Here is a list of compatible processors: https://www.gigabyte.com/Ajax/Suppor...8&Type=Product

Do I need to be concerned with the TDP (thermal design power)? The i5 processor I am considering (i5-4460) has a TDP of 84W, whereas my current processor has a TDP of 54W.
 

Last edited by mossman; 09-12-17 at 10:05 AM.
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Old 09-12-17, 11:28 AM
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i5 is getting to be an old processor, can't go to an i7?
 
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Old 09-12-17, 12:07 PM
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I don't need an awful lot of speed, and don't want to pay more than about $200. The i5-4460 is just over $200. Core i7 with 1150 socket runs from $370 to $950.

I can actually get a 3.7 GHz Core i3 with hyperthreading for $147, which would be comparable to a quad core i5 (right?)
 

Last edited by mossman; 09-12-17 at 12:30 PM.
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Old 09-12-17, 12:59 PM
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Every computer is different (the C drive is always the bottleneck on the one with which I have trouble). I'm just thinking that it would be a waste to go through all of this and still have the bottleneck in the same place. If you think these will suffice for you, I'm good with that.
 
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Old 09-12-17, 07:42 PM
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i5 is not necessarily older than i7. You have to look at the models within each series. Intel is allegedly planning to release a Core i5-8400 sometime in the second half of 2017. Likewise one can't say that an i3 will be the same, better, or worse than an i5 without specifying actual models to compare and looking at all the specs.

In terms of some CPUs being older, the problem you'll run into is the compatibility between CPU socket and CPU architecture. The LGA1150 architecture supported Intel's Broadwell and Haswell architectures, which are older architectures. The LGA1151 architecture would support the newer Skylake and Kaby Lake CPUs, but that would mean a mobo swap.

Sticking within the LGA1150 socket, you're going to be dealing with older architecture chips whether you go with i3, i5 or i7. That said, I run an i7-4790K on an 1150 socket mobo, and I have no complaints, even though it's an older architecture.

In terms of TDP, that means it will give off more heat. How's your existing cooling?

Now then, Stickshift does bring up a great point -- what exactly are you unhappy about performance-wise, and what are you trying to do with the system?
 
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Old 09-13-17, 05:47 AM
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It's strange that the builder used a Pentium chip, if it were only a few years ago. Anyway, before you do an upgrade, set the virtual memory to system managed.
 
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Old 09-13-17, 05:47 AM
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It seems sluggish overall, especially when opening Office applications. And it is slower than the 10 year old PC I replaced, which bugs me. I was speaking with a friend of mine last night, and he mentioned the hard drive being the possible culprit/bottleneck. I ran a benchmark on it and it does appear to be a bit slow. I didn't even realize at the time I had the PC built that there were different classes/speeds of hard drive (referring to non-SSD). I also just realized I only have one 4GB stick of RAM (Super Talent DDR3 1600 MHz), when the mobo can handle up to 32GB I believe. Should I increase my RAM and see if that helps?
 
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Old 09-13-17, 05:50 AM
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Anyway, before you do an upgrade, set the virtual memory to system managed.
How do I do that? ///////

Sounds like Super Talent memory could be slowing me down as well:

http://www.overclockers.com/super-ta...memory-review/
 
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Old 09-13-17, 06:07 AM
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Click on the start button, right click on Computer, left click on Advanced System Settings. Left click on Performance. Under the Visual Effects tab, Check Let Windows choose what's best for my computer. Then click the Advanced tab. Under Virtual Memory, click change. Check Automatically manage page file. Click OK
 
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Old 09-13-17, 06:16 AM
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I don't see those options. I'm running Windows 7
 
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Old 09-13-17, 06:25 AM
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I only have one 4GB stick of RAM
That could be your biggest problem, it would be the first thing I would upgrade. There is no such thing as too much RAM.
 
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Old 09-13-17, 06:39 AM
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I took those options from Windows 7.
 
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Old 09-13-17, 07:38 AM
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To clarify, it's Start Button -> Right Click on "Computer" -> Click on "Properties" -> Click on "Advanced System Settings," then continue as Donato says. Let us know if that works.

Systems also tend to slow down as more stuff gets installed through the life of the system and runs in the background. I've found that certain brands of antivirus software can be massive system hogs, and if they're running file scans every time you click to open a Word document for example, that'll slow down the loading too.

On the topic, I'm assuming you are running antivirus software and have checked for malware?

Just trying to troubleshoot other options, since Office isn't exactly the most resource intensive program to be bogging down on.
 
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Old 09-13-17, 07:46 AM
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Hmm, if it was built within the last 2 years (motherboard seems 2015ish)
but only has 4 gigs of memory is your Windows 7 32-bit or 64-bit?
If you're running a 32 bit OS the computer will only "see" 4 gigs of memory.

First thing I'd do is put another 4 gigs of memory in.
Second thing, consider the built in "readyboost" cache feature, check around for an
old CF or SD card or usb drive. That cache can help immensely.
 
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Old 09-13-17, 07:56 AM
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To clarify, it's Start Button -> Right Click on "Computer" -> Click on "Properties" -> Click on "Advanced System Settings," then continue as Donato says. Let us know if that works.
Yes, I see it now.

Systems also tend to slow down as more stuff gets installed through the life of the system and runs in the background. I've found that certain brands of antivirus software can be massive system hogs, and if they're running file scans every time you click to open a Word document for example, that'll slow down the loading too.
I was using Avast in the past, which was really slowing things down, but now I am using Microscoft Security Essentials.

On the topic, I'm assuming you are running antivirus software and have checked for malware?
I've checked several times with AntiSpyWare and Malware Bytes, nothing found.

Just trying to troubleshoot other options, since Office isn't exactly the most resource intensive program to be bogging down on.
 
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Old 09-13-17, 07:59 AM
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Eh, which version of Windows 7 are you running, is it 32-bit or 64-bit?
I ask because if you're running a 32 bit version of windows 7, then the computer can only "see" 4 gigs of memory.
32-bit. So getting another 4GB stick won't do any good if I'm using Windows 7 32-bit?
 
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Old 09-13-17, 08:05 AM
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I'll run HD Tune this evening. What would be an acceptable transfer rate for a 7200 RPM disk drive?
 
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Old 09-13-17, 08:13 AM
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Seems like by the time you spend all the money on upgrading a processor and ram, you can get a newer 64-bit computer already built with all those specs, for not much more.
 
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Old 09-13-17, 08:25 AM
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Correct, because you're running a 32 bit OS, you will see no benefit from upgrading the RAM past what you have already.
 
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Old 09-13-17, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by mossman View Post
32-bit. So getting another 4GB stick won't do any good if I'm using Windows 7 32-bit?
Here's what I would do- add a 2nd hard drive, more ram, and upgrade to 64-bit windows 10 .

Cost of $75-100 to upgrade the existing computer.

Here's how. (I've done a few of these upgrades...)

1) Download the free Windows 10 upgrade for Windows 7, (still available).
Run the "will Windows 10 run on my computer" as a diagnostic, see if your system will run a 64-bit OS.
If it will, then proceed to add a 2nd hard drive, more ram, and upgrade to 64-bit windows .

2) Buy a hybrid ssd drive, I got a refurbished terrabyte drive 2 years ago, from Amazon, for $60. Install it. Boot to Windows 7 to make sure the new drive is recognized.

3) Download the 64 bit Windows 10 upgrade onto a usb drive, install 64 bit Windows 10 on the NEW hard drive, e.g. D: drive. KEEP the existing Windows 7 OS on C: drive. Boot to Win 7 and Win10 to be sure they both work.

4) Buy a matching 4 gig memory chip, add memory. Boot to both, Win7 won't notice anything different, Win10 should see the entire 8 gigs.

Done.
You will basically have 2 computers in 1 case.
Your old WIndows 7 computer with 4 gigs of memory (and all your programs and files)
and a new Windows 10 computer with 8 gigs of memory.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 09-13-17 at 09:30 AM.
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Old 09-13-17, 09:51 AM
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The Intel website says the Pentium G3420 supports 64 bit, so I'm assuming that means I can do it? Will I need to be concerned with certain programs not working though? I have some older programs I use that were release prior to 64 bit becoming popular.
 
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Old 09-13-17, 10:28 AM
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Win10 does have a "compatibility settings" menu, where it will emulate Win XP, Win7 etc, when running an older program.
I've found that most programs (MS Office 2003 & 2010) work fine without the compatibly settings,
however when running hardware setups or driver updates, then you do want to run the compatibility troubleshooter.
 
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Old 09-13-17, 10:29 AM
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You could also install Windows 7 onto a virtual machine if needed.
 
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Old 09-15-17, 02:54 PM
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I don't see the point of spending that much money on a new slug (or any money, for that matter) if you don't have any evidence that the old one is a bottleneck. To make an analogy, what you're suggesting is that you think you should switch the carburetor on your car for a bigger one because you don't think it's acceleration is brisk enough, but you don't have any diagnostic test results indicating that there's anything the matter with the old carb.

For starters, the biggest bang for your upgrade buck at the moment is replacing the HDD the OS is on with an SSD. The HDD always was the slowest component in a PC by a YUGE margin because it's the only one in the entire data processing chain with moving parts. Swapping CPUs might make your PC run faster but even that is no guaratee that it's eliminating your worst bottleneck(s). An SSD will make your system faster, in spite of any and all other bottlenecks. One that's in your budget might not have enough storage space to fill your needs but you can use the existing HDD for additional storage and maintain the majority of the speed improvement the SSD offers.

There's nothing in you description that makes me think it's the hardware's fault. In fact, I'd bet a box of glazed donuts there's something 'wonky' with your install. Some installs are bad from birth, some get munged or less than ideally configured as you add applications and personalizations, and all Micro$loth OSes degrade with age. If I were you, my first step would be to reinstall the OS, even if I had to do it myself. Every "geek" worthy of the title got his start learning to fix things he'd boogered up his own self.

If you're not that adventurous, feel around with a few of your most tech-savvy friends and relatives and see if there's anyone they'd recommend to help you. The best help you can have for a problem like this often is people who only do this sort of thing as a personal favor, and they usually only advertise by word of mouth. Someone with broad enough of a background might even be able to heal it by laying on of hands and save you from a reinstall.

Adding >4GB of RAM won't do anything for a 32-bit OS unless you've got PAE enabled. There are advantages to switching to a 64-bit OS, even if you don't add more than 4GB of RAM (the 3GB barrier). But there also are potential drawbacks, especially with drivers. Drivers are bit-specific and you might have trouble finding 64-bit drivers for old peripherals. Unless I'm mistaken, your original key code won't care whether the media you're installing from is 32-bit or 64-bit, so long as the 'version' (Home, Pro, Ultimate, etc) matches.

If you're determined to go that route, there are i7 Socket 1150 CPUs available on eBay for <$250.
 
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Old 09-15-17, 04:13 PM
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Mr Fred dobbs I see your point on the matter... Im pretty computer savy. The old XP computers I used to try to upgrade to make faster, but with win 10 these are hogs to say the least..

I just acquired a 3rd computer for the spouse from the dell outlet store scratch and dent. 350$ shipped. How can you beat that....

7th gen i5 3.1ghz
1 TB drive
8 gig ram.

Its a lap top but the same specs I am running in my desktop.

My other laptop is the same but a i3 processor..

My point is cost to try to fix a home built is usually not worth it IMO...

But to each his own..
 
  #26  
Old 09-19-17, 06:42 PM
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Bump-

Thanks, in part to this thread, I've just found a really simple performance tweak for ReadyBoost.

Find an old USB stick, 2GB to 4GB or so. Make sure it works with readyboost

1) Reformat the USB drive to ExFat
2) Set the cluster size to 512kb
3) Dedicate it to Readyboost in the file menu
4) Set it to optimize for speed in the device manager menu.

Takes about 10 minutes,
but that combination has made a significant difference on my ancient Dell Dimension 5150.
Page loading and response are much faster.

Is now smoothly streaming HD video, when previously it was stuttering and buffering.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 12:41 AM
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How can you beat that....
Well, HP tower, i5 3.2GMhz, 1T hd, 8GB ram (exp to 32), DVD-RW, Triple monitor card, 1Ghz network card, 3 full size exp slots, 2(?) 1/2 size....$180 shipped no tax no shipping. 1mo free return, 90day free shipping for free repair, 1 year free repair parts. Lifetime phone support.

Yeah, it's a full size tower (apples and oranges) and I didn't believe the price, but it was an off lease from a company that tests and refurbs and sells on ebay. Out of IN or IL IIRC. Would have been $165 but I wanted the video card upgrade for $15. Has worked like a champ and they were very helpful on the phone when I called before purchase.

Hmmm wonder if they have any laptops.....
 
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