What is the most budget-conscious way to install a patio?


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Old 06-13-16, 08:22 AM
U
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Question What is the most budget-conscious way to install a patio?

My wife would love a patio at the rear of our house. It's not an area that will ever see vehicle traffic or anything extremely heavy. I'm thinking of pouring concrete a section at a time. I would mix by hand and pour 9 or 10 square feet per night.I would place expansion material between old and new pours and frame the outside edges. I'm not sure how big the total patio will be yet. I'm trying to convince my wife of how much work it will all be.
I have experience with flatwork and pavers but I was always working for a contractor with power equipment and I wasn't paying the bills. In this case everything will be done by hand, my hands. The ground is flat but I need to tear out the topsoil, spread gravel and all of that.
Am I crazy? Is this possible or is it going to fall apart?
I don't think pavers would be less money. I'm not afraid of the work, just the expense. Any advice or instruction is welcome. Thanks!
 
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Old 06-13-16, 09:30 AM
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I wouldn't say "crazy" but I would say you'd be in for sore muscles and by the time you're done it might be cheaper to have a ready mix truck bring several yards of concrete and pour the patio in one shot. 9 or 10 squrare feet is only about 3' square and for a 4" thick slab will take six 80lb bags. If you were just doing a 3 or 4' square pad I'd say use bag concrete but when doing a whole patio I think you'd be much happier with the results if it were done in one pour.
 
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Old 06-13-16, 12:11 PM
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As PD said a truck might be cheaper and would definitely be quicker although finishing concrete is a lot of hard work so you'd want help if you pour it all at once!
 
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Old 06-13-16, 12:23 PM
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I will look at the cost options of getting ready mix in a truck.
To me the advantage of going in small sections is that I can pour a section at a time, as I have time. If it takes me a month to finish, so be it.
If I go this route, say 3x3 squares, should I tie the sections together with wire or rebar? Or should I let each section float individually? I'm leaning towards rebar and wire.
 
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Old 06-13-16, 12:32 PM
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Having rebar intersect the various pads should prevent one from settling more than the adjacent one and is how I'd likely do it if pouring small pads as I had time.
 
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Old 06-14-16, 07:32 AM
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Patio

Achieving a uniform appearance when doing small sections will be difficult. Spend a little more and have it done in one pour.
 
 

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