rim joist adjustment for final deck board


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Old 08-22-16, 11:11 AM
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rim joist adjustment for final deck board

Hi Gang. New here. Looks like a great forum with helpful folks.

I'm nearly finished installing the deck boards of our new composite, cantilevered deck. The deck has a 2-board picture frame around it. Also, when I began laying the floor, I started near the house and worked outward because of a small complicated side piece. And of course, the last board is ending up about 2" shy of where I'd like it to end. I'd like the piece to finish 1.5" past the rim joist, and it's now finishing at .5" shy of the rim joist, thus the 2" shortage.

I don't want to install a 2" ripped piece before putting down the 2 picture frame boards, so I'm thinking my only option is to add another full 5.5" wide board. This would push the final board about 5" past the rim joist... or 3.5" beyond the desired 1.5" goal. So, I'm thinking the best thing here would be to attach two 2x10's onto the existing rim joist (which is 3' past the cantilever beam). That would essentially extend the deck by 3" and would get me pretty close. (I plan to add fascia boards and under-decking later.)
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I wondered what thoughts you might have for/against that, as well as any tips for ensuring a proper attachment (screw types/sizes, etc). My main concern is having the 3 2x10's attached solidly to the joist ends, though they would never be walked on (being outside the railing).

Thanks!
 
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Old 08-22-16, 11:42 AM
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Nice looking deck!

I think your plan is fine. I'd attach the 2x10s with Flat-loks, a version of the ledgerlok with a flatter head. They are available 6 or 6 3/4 long so you could go through existing rim into the joist ends. Two every other joist should be plenty. That will be plenty strong even if someone does climb on it. Deck lumber being what it is, your biggest problem will likely be getting the edges lined up well enough along the whole length for the decking to lie flat...a power plane makes quick work of leveling any high spots.

Your other option is to remove the existing rim and sister out the joists. I would do that if it really needed to be structural but in this case it seems like real overkill.
 
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Old 08-22-16, 01:28 PM
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Carbide, thanks for the encouragement and tips! Notching the existing joists never crossed my mind... very clever!
 
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Old 09-02-16, 06:22 AM
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Wanted to give an update on this issue... I ended up removing the original rim joist, then cutting around 3" off the end of the 20 attaching joists. This took a bit more work but was worth it because it allowed me to make minor length adjustments to the joists so that the final floor board extended evenly beyond the top of the rim joist.

Even though the framers laid a nice square deck frame, it turns out I was installing the floor boards and hidden fasteners more snugly one the floor board's ends. So, by the time I reached the final boards approaching the rim joist, the outer ends were 3/4" shorter than the middle of the floor board. By having removed the rim joists, I could cut each joist to the needed length.

After removing the rim joist, I ran into a different problem. The attached floor joists began to move a little, as did the long rim joist board. They had been installed 2 months ago. This made re-attaching the rim joist more difficult. I ended up using a truck jack atop a large step ladder and underneath one end of the rim joist that was bent lower, while I worked from the opposite end of the rim joist, attaching 2 large Ledger Lok screws into each joist... and re-adjusting the jack height after each joist was reattached. Surprisingly, the truck jack worked very well for getting the exact positions. Bit of work, but it's all good now. (I've attached a photo of the ladder/jack.)Name:  rim joist adjustment.jpg
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Old 09-02-16, 09:20 AM
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Almost every non-trivial project springs a few surprises, and part of being a good DIY'er is learning how to deal with them as they arise. You did well!
 
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Old 09-02-16, 09:45 AM
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Carbide, thanks again! Your earlier comments actually led me to the solution of the rim joist removal and I'm very glad I went that route. Also, your suggestion of the flat head screws was right on! I put two 4.5" FastenMaster HeadLOK screws in each joist end and they are solid. Much better than the original sinker nails that they replaced. The rim joist was previously wanting to pull away from the joists but is now securely fastened. Thanks!!!
 
 

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