Handrail easing installation?

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Old 01-12-17, 03:45 PM
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Handrail easing installation?

I'm installing a simple handrail, 6010 profile, and want to add simple start (7010) and over (7013+7019 or 7009 returned end) easing at the bottom and top. It seems it should be a very simple procedure, however.. I never did it before.

1. My stairs are sloped at 36, The easings are all made for 60! Am I supposed to saw off 24 (almost half of the turn)??? It makes no sense

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2. Do I have to use a metal screw to attach them to the main rail, or can I simply glue them with wood glue?

3. There are start easings with cap - can I use them without a newel post?
3a. There are no overeasings with cap, only returned end. Is there a code against it?

4. Almost nobody provides schematics with exact sizes for these parts. Where do I find them?

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Old 01-12-17, 04:03 PM
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1). You cut the easing square with the profile at the location where it will match the square end of your handrail. Square to square. Cutting off the extra makes perfect sense... the additional length is because they don't know how much angle you need or what part is going on next. Could be an up easing for all they know.

2). Yes, you drill a 1" hole in the bottom of one half or the other, drill a pilot hole and insert your rail bolt in the other half, then after a test fit, apply the wood glue and tighten the nut on your half-round washer with the rail bolt wrench . Plug the 1" hole and sand it flat.

3). If you live in an area where there are codes to follow, yes it is probably against code to start a handrail without a return when it is over a post. (R311.7.8) if it's near a wall, the handrail gets returned to the wall.

4). Probably because there is practically no occasion where you would need the actual dimensions of the parts, and the companies know that.
 
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Old 01-12-17, 06:56 PM
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To expand on how the parts should be connected, see these instructions. It is super easy provided you can follow simple directions and drill a straight hole.

http://ljsmith.com/assets/files/pdf/3044Railbolts.pdf

You will want the wrench, LJ-3044 and a kit with some bolts, washers, nuts and plugs. LJ-3079. You can't do this without the wrench.
 
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Old 01-12-17, 08:30 PM
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And here's one more pic so that you can visualize where to cut. It's why I said square to square... where the angle of your cut will end up being square with the "bead" that is along the bottom of the 6010. (represented in the link below by the square that I drew around that bead, in relation to the cut line).

http://i231.photobucket.com/albums/e...psztziyjru.png

The scrap (the piece that you cut off) can be very useful to save if you ever need to transition a piece of handrail with a miter. Instead of having a sharp change of angle, a short transition piece like that can be used to gently ease the transition between 2 angles... say, where a 36 slope turns into an 18 slope.
 
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Old 01-13-17, 05:54 PM
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Thanks!

Thanks for the detailed reply! This makes it much more clear.

I'd love to make that cut, and I understand the geometry, but I'm afraid that it's impossible to cut it for a seamless fit... How do people do it? There's always an error in the cut. If I'm a millimeter off anywhere, the profiles will not match and I'll have an ugly seam.

If I'm just 1 off (that's about the thickness of the saw blade, which is 1/8", which is 1.1 on a pie slice with 6 1/4" radius), the error is 1.75%. On a 2 3/8" profile it's over 1/32" (or 1/64" on both sides), which is a very noticeable seam. How do I hide it? I can't sand it off anywhere but on the top and bottom of the profile.

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Old 01-13-17, 06:29 PM
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You set it flat on the miter saw (just as its drawn in the illustration) and put a shim between it and the fence so that it's sitting parallel to the fence and can't move. You set your miter to 0, and your bevel to 36 right and you cut it. There is always some sanding to do... best thing to do is to match the bottom bead up on both sides, the rest can be sanded as needed to make it match and look good.

You should lay your handrail right on the stairs, and when you match up your miters the bottom of that piece should be level. If it isn't, adjust your cut. You have to pick just the right spot on that bead so that it looks continuous. In other words, the bead on your easing should not be at too flat of an angle (too soon) or too sharp of an angle (too late)... pick the right spot and assuming 36 is the right angle like you said it should all work out.

If your cut really is the way you have it drawn, then you probably have already cut it too short. You should have picked a spot higher on the easing to make your cut.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 09:33 AM
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Thanks! I'll give it a try. I didn't cut it, I drew an idea - that anything you cut always has some error.

Also, yes, 36 isn't really the angle because the handrail is, of course, not straight. It's ~2 prone in my case. So it's ~35 over easing and ~37 start easing...

Maybe I'll try to cut a bit early and sand it with a belt sander if I can't make the correct enough cut. If it's 1 off of horizon, that's 1/8" off, probably not very noticeable on a 6" piece without other horizontal lines close by. I guess no way to find out but to try it.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 10:39 AM
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Not ideal but I have done a little carving and a lot of sanding to make a not so professional carpenter's work look better. The better you can make the fit the easier it will be to make it look nice!
 
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Old 01-14-17, 10:49 AM
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As mentioned earlier, sanding is always needed when joining handrail. Those parts will usually need 1/32" of sanding on top and bottom. Thats why I say concentrate on lining up the beaded part... it has to line up because its the most critical part of the profile.

The angles are easy to cut perfect every time if you use a Bosch digital angle finder or similar. Knowledge of geometry is nice but isn't required.
 
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