Stone exterior stairs and footings


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Old 03-07-17, 08:25 PM
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Stone exterior stairs and footings

Hello everyone. I was hoping for some thoughts on ways others have seen this done. I have composite/wood stairs about 48" tall on my house. Block runs up to the top of the stair height and down about 5 1/4' below grade.

I'd like to replace the stairs with hardscape/stone. I've mocked up something below with a view of the house with the existing stairs and something not exactly like but along the lines of what I'm looking to do. Note the shape will be different and there will of course be handrails. :P

My question is, how have others seen this done? At first the city felt it needed a footer but without everything cemented together I don't see how a footer will do much. The ground can still move under pavers and I wasn't planning on pouring concrete and then attaching stone to it. (Which of course WOULD require a footing without a doubt.)

Of course I'm not asking anyone to interpret code but if you're familiar with the IBC for me but whatever constructive thoughts you might have are appreciated!

Current front entrance:
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Similar to the planned front entrance:
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Old 03-07-17, 08:46 PM
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Well, this is a job for an engineer, but I'm pretty sure he or she will detail footings that start full depth (down to house footing) next to the house, and then slant up to frost depth or so as you move away from the house wall. Those footings would be tied into the CBU wall as well.

That's a nice looking design; the last thing you want is for it to settle and pull away from the house.
 
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Old 03-08-17, 03:45 AM
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First thing I noticed is the height, stairs or deck that high will require railings.

A hybrid design would be to leave the "deck" as is and just replace the stairs.

I have a 3 step front porch that I installed pre-cast steps and they come in different colors and widths.

Much lighter, quicker to install and they would only need a 4" concrete pad to sit on.
 
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Old 03-08-17, 05:56 AM
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I agree that with that mass of all that masonry/stone you will need a proper footer. Since the house was over dug during construction you'll have to get at least as deep as the house's footers near the house. Once you dig out past the zone that was disturbed during the initial construction you might step the footer up to a shallower depth while still staying below your frost depth. It's up to you to determine if it's worthwhile for the cosmetics but you're in for a relatively expensive, major excavation and construction project.
 
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Old 03-08-17, 08:16 AM
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The reason I ask about the footing primarily is:
1) I don't see anyone else on a single video or forum doing footings for similar projects
2) The footing would do much to support the sidewalls but nothing to support the interior which would be floating on class 5 crush.

So the way it seemed is that it would still be subject to deformation and heaving and only the sidewalls would stay in place. Or is that not how the structure would be affected? It seems like if the middle was allowed to move and the sides were fixed with a footing, it would start pushing the stairs forward over time.

The only place I can find where people actually did a footer was when they were pouring concrete and then gluing the stone to the concrete. (And typically this was after the fact because they were adding stone to old concrete stairs.)

Thanks for the thoughts and yes, I would add a handrail. Actually the final design will be a lot different. It will curve slightly and have a yet undefined planting area next to it. (As sloppily indicated...)
 
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Old 03-08-17, 10:47 AM
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Heaving is caused by water in the soil freezing and expanding upwards. There is almost no water in fill stone so there is no heaving.
 
 

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