Bathroom remodel: sequence of jobs?

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Old 02-20-17, 08:38 AM
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Bathroom remodel: sequence of jobs?

I had a flood, and I have insurance coverage for the flooring - living area hardwood and bathroom tile. State Farm's provider seems very good, and I will use them for the hardwood, but I want to take the opportunity to do additional bathroom remodeling that they don't do. I plan to ask State Farm if I can split the coverage between their provider and my contractor, but if I can't, how would it work to have their provider re-tile the floor and my contractor do the remaining jobs: new wall tiles, new shower body, new sink, new medicine cabinet, new vanity light, painting, plastering, (and hardwood flooring in the living area). Many thanks for guidance.
 
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Old 02-20-17, 01:22 PM
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I am assuming there is an existing shower that will stay in place, is that correct? Do you have access to the shower body from behind it? Closet, bedroom wall? Sheetrock can be repaired, but it is easier to access the valve from behind when it can't be accessed from the front.

IF I were doing it, I would want the floor to be last so as not to booger it up with all the other activity. You can have it done before, just protect it with ram board or similar product taped down to the tile. Basically you can do any part at any time, keeping in mind the messy stuff needs to be first, such as repairing walls with compound, making holes for the medicine cabinet and light if needed.
 
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Old 02-20-17, 02:05 PM
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"Do you have access to the shower body from behind it?"

Contractor said wall has to be broken to access shower body. It's an apartment; my bathroom backs on to next-door's neighbor's wall.

"If I were doing it, I would want the floor to be last so as not to booger it up with all the other activity."

So contractor does everything except floor, and insurance provider comes in to do floor tiling. Would it then be OK to remove toilet and new sink for tiling work? Thanks.
 
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Old 02-20-17, 03:51 PM
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IF it is an apartment, then the landlord makes the calls anyway. Liability issues exist if you were to attempt or cause any repairs to be made.
 
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Old 02-20-17, 04:23 PM
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It's actually a co-op, with a managing agent company standing in for a landlord. Shareholders renovate kitchens and bathrooms here all the time. I've already spoken to the resident building manager and everyone is on board.

It's just that it's a bit unusual because it's an insurance issue and I want the split the job between State Farm's person and the contractor.

Will be grateful for any guidance on sequencing.

Thanks.
 
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Old 02-20-17, 06:16 PM
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How does the contractor plan on un-breaking the shower wall? Plumbers don't do tile work.

Your sequencing plan is good.
 
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Old 02-20-17, 07:05 PM
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"How does the contractor plan on un-breaking the shower wall? Plumbers don't do tile work."

Contractor will subcontract with plumber.

"Your sequencing plan is good."

I'm not sure I understand - a sequencing plan is what I am asking about.

Thanks.
 
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Old 02-20-17, 08:02 PM
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So contractor does everything except floor, and insurance provider comes in to do floor tiling. Would it then be OK to remove toilet and new sink for tiling work? Thanks.
Since you aren't doing the work, the contractor comes in, does his/her work, then insurance. Yes, the toilet and vanity can be removed, but the contractor will probably do that anyway.
 
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Old 02-20-17, 08:21 PM
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"Since you aren't doing the work, the contractor comes in, does his/her work, then insurance. Yes, the toilet and vanity can be removed, but the contractor will probably do that anyway."

Since I will be doing the scheduling, I would need greater detail on how to sequence and coordinate the tasks the contractor is going to do with the tasks the insurance company's provider is going to do.

It will also be important to determine how long the bathroom will be out of commission if I use the two different providers.
 

Last edited by ellenmw; 02-20-17 at 08:58 PM.
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Old 02-21-17, 04:06 AM
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I plan to ask State Farm if I can split the coverage between their provider and my contractor, but if I can't, how would it work to have their provider re-tile the floor and my contractor do the remaining jobs: new wall tiles, new shower body, new sink, new medicine cabinet, new vanity light, painting, plastering, (and hardwood flooring in the living area).
In my experience from being flooded last year, State Farm will send an adjuster out to assess the flood damage & write you a check for that amount. You can use any contractors you want to. It does not have to be a contractor on their list. YOU chose YOUR preferred contractor to do the work they paid you for. Additionally, you can have that contractor do any additional work you want to have done & pay that yourself.
Whether its State Farms preferred contractor, or another contractor you choose, that/those contractor(s) can do any of the jobs you need done whether it's flood related, or your personal updates outside of the flood damage. Additionally, if you want to use their contractor for flood & another contract for your updates, you can do that as well. In my experience, State Farm is just going to assess the damage & pay you for the damages you incurred. Its up to you to get the damages repaired.
In my experience, this works a little different from car accident procedures. For car accidents, you take it to a body shop & State Farm pays the shop after work is done. Flood issues are as stated above. They pay you & you get a contractor(s) to do the work & pay them with the money State Farm gives you for damages.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 04:26 AM
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Seek out a contractor who is "Turn Key" and will handle all aspects of the remodel. He will be able to provide the sequence of events for you and guide you along the way. What you will be responsible for is picking out the vanity, counter top, tile, general design and your vision of how things are to look upon completion. No reason to have to play general contractor for a small project like a bath remodel. Your contractor will have access to subs who will provide services up to his standards.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 07:46 AM
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Dixie 2012,

There are advantages to using State Farm's provider for the floor within the PSP program rather than receiving the check:
1 - State Farm provides some oversight on performance
2 - State Farm gives a 5-year warranty for the work

I think my best choice will be to have the local contractor do everything but the floor. It would be very helpful if I could understand the sequence of jobs.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 08:14 AM
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And that's fine. My point was you can have them (the same contractor) to do all the work you want (most likely) outside of the flood damage. I am sure they will sub contract any work they dont specialize in, as would any contractor that you hire. Refer to Czizzi's post.

I'm just trying to convey that, you can do it either way. I am sure they can do it or get it done for you.

Personally, I'd get the floors done last.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 10:36 AM
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"Personally, I'd get the floors done last."

Many thanks, Dixie. That's what I needed to know - very helpful.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 10:47 AM
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Good rule of thumb; structure starts from the bottom up, finishes start from the top down.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 11:02 AM
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"Good rule of thumb; structure starts from the bottom up, finishes start from the top down."

Thanks - but I'm not sure what qualifies as structure v. finishes! And if job has both structure and finishes, still not sure what the exact sequence should be, especially since I will be scheduling a different provider for the floor.

Tasks
- new shower body (wall needs to be broken for this)
- new tiled floor
- new tiled walls
- new sink + faucet (wall needs to be broken for this)
- new medicine cabinet
- plastering
- painting

Grateful for guidance.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 01:18 PM
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Structure is mainly the framing. I'm not sure if I know what your definition of a shower body is If you mean the fiberglass/plastic shower walls/floor - that normally goes in prior to the drywall being hung.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 01:28 PM
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I really think you are hung up on "sequencing" This is not a problem with contractors. We do this stuff every day. It is not something you need to worry over. Pick out your fixtures and let them do the work. If I were the contractor, I would send you on a shopping trip, anyway, because I would have a job to do and you would only slow things down. I'm not being mean, just a fact of life. The contractor will know what to do and how to do it. Just tell them what you want in specifics.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 01:44 PM
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"I'm not sure if I know what your definition of a shower body is."

Marksr - Here the term "shower body" refers to the plumbing equipment associated with a shower. Maybe the term would be "shower valve body"? https://www.deltafaucet.com/bathroom...ct/R10000-UNBX
Don't think drywall will be involved - just breaking the wall to replace existing.

Thanks.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 01:46 PM
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Ok, that has to have open studs to be mounted .... which can be accomplished by cutting an access hole in existing drywall on either side of the wall.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 01:49 PM
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"If I were the contractor, I would send you on a shopping trip, anyway, because I would have a job to do and you would only slow things down."

Chandler - sexist, condescending and disrespectful attitudes and remarks such as yours are the very reason I want to learn as much as I can about how the job should be done.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 01:54 PM
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"Ok, that has to have open studs to be mounted .... which can be accomplished by cutting an access hole in existing drywall on either side of the wall."

Maksr - many thanks for the explanation. Anything else you can tell me about the job will be extremely welcome.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 02:32 PM
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Ellen, Chandler was not being sexist, just pointing out that overly hands on homeowners tend to bog the process down. A competent contractor know the proper steps and will follow best practices to get your job done correctly. This includes pick up and delivery of materials that you picked out, making sure enough of those materials are on hand and ready to install. Common for a homeowner to under estimate how much tile will be needed as they don't account for cuts (waste) based on the layout of the room. That is just an example, but many ways to slow the project down once started.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 02:42 PM
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Another example of how you can complicate the process is purchasing tile from a box store (Big Orange or Big Blue). Many times they are what is referred to as seconds. In fact, if a homeowner asks me to install tile from a box store i have refused to do so as the tiles are not square. I have had instances where tiles were out of square by more than 3/16" which makes it impossible to hold a grout line and the end result is a poor looking install regardless of who laid the tile. Contractors worth their salt will guide you to reputable suppliers - may not be the cheapest, but the quality will be there.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 02:47 PM
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Czizzi - I'm sorry, but telling someone with an identifiably female name to "go on a shopping trip because [they] have a job to do" is DECIDEDLY sexist.

I will be using providers from two different companies, and as there is only one bathroom here it will be very important to reduce downtime.

I had the idea that members of a DIY forum could help me understand how the different aspects of the job should be sequenced to minimize the inconvenience for me and to be done properly.

It seems I was wrong about that.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 03:09 PM
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-Demolition
-Repair of Damage
-Floor Prep
-Wall Prep
-Plumbing Rough ins
-Construct Curb and Pre-slope for shower
-Pan Liner
-72 hour flood test of drain body
-Cement Board on walls
-Sheet Rock on walls
-Blend two together
-Second Mud pan Pre-slope
-Tile Walls
-Grout Walls
-Tile Shower Floor
-Install Vanity
-Finish Drywall
-Caulk Everything
-Paint Walls
-Plumbing/Drain Hook ups at Vanity
-Install Floor Tile
-Grout Floor Tile
-Install Baseboard Molding
-Install Toilet
-Install Mirror and Vanity Light
-Install shower glass door
-Seal all grout
 
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Old 02-21-17, 03:13 PM
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Many, many thanks, Czizzi.

That was very decent of you, and I am truly grateful.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 03:22 PM
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Every job takes on a life of its own, so use the list as a general guide. There are many subsets under each category that need to be done and how long that takes is a question mark. Suggest that you budget a port-a-potty into your project so you have access to a toilet during construction. Washing can be done at the kitchen sink.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 03:38 PM
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"Port-a-potty"

What a great idea! I'll look into it right away.

Again, many thanks.
 
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Old 02-21-17, 04:35 PM
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Far be it for me to be sexist, condescending or disrespectful. Chris was right. Too many hands in the stew makes it sour.....or something like that. Contractors know what to do and can do it best without intervention. I send men out shopping if necessary, or fishing, or cloud watching. The job will so smoothly if you let things fall into place. Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 02-22-17, 02:41 AM
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You also want to check the references of any contractor you hire. I agree the less interference from the customer while the work is being done the better. That doesn't mean the customer shouldn't be involved with the progress but it's easier to get the job done in a timely manner when we are allowed to do our work. A good contractor will do just as good of a job without you looking over his shoulder. The ones that won't shouldn't have been hired in the first place which is why it's important to know as much as you can about their work before you agree to have them do the work.

I've never known the regular responders in the forums to be sexist.
 
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Old 02-22-17, 03:00 AM
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We just finished a 600 sf hardwood floor installation at a lady's house. She is in Florida selling her house, so this one is empty. Her father, whom I go to church with, let us in the house.......and stayed there the entire time. Every 5th word out of my mouth was "move". He was constantly walking in our way, and it only slowed us down.
 
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