What is a hardboard door?

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Old 04-08-16, 02:58 PM
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What is a hardboard door?

A local retailer is having a sale on something called a "textured hardboard door."

The picture looks like nice white 6-panel or arched-2-panels, but what exactly is a hardboard door? Would you spend a little more and get something nicer? I am looking for a solid, heavier door to replave 1950s-era varnished single-panel doors.

Also they come only in 80-inch pre-hung, and the hole from the door header to the floor in my house is 79 inches. So canthese hardboard doors be cut at the bottom to make them fit?


Thanks in advance for any advice, help.
 
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Old 04-08-16, 03:13 PM
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Hardboard, or Masonite doors are a staple product. Personally I opt for solid doors with a little more character, but they paint up nicely. You can cut the bottom of the door some, but try to limit it to 1/2" or so, or you will cut into the hollow part of the door. This will necessitate you removing the masonite from the plug you cut out and gluing it back in the door hollow. If you only have 79" total for the opening, the door and frame will not fit anyway. It requires anywhere from 81 1/2 to 82" head space to install a framed door. I would opt for solid doors.
 
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Old 04-08-16, 03:32 PM
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Thanks Chandler. That was what I thought too about this door.

Yah, the opening is total 79 inches from the bottom of the header to the surface of the hardwood floor and would like to avoid any cutting if possible.

I have an old 1950s 2-bedroom ranch of 1,000 square feet, so I'm thinking arch 2-panel will look nice and fit the construction time period. Don't want to break the bank, replacing 5 hall/bedroom doors and 4 closet doors.

I have natural maple strip flooring, so am looking for doors that match the floor. What do you think about a solid pine door either painted or stained/poly'ed, or just poly'ed without staining?

Thanks again!
 
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Old 04-08-16, 03:37 PM
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I'm a wood guy and don't like to paint it, so it is a personal choice. The solid doors will be more amenable to your cutting them for the height restriction you have. Be sure to leave a gap above the hardwood floor for the door to swing and for some ventilation. When you cut the door, make your mark using a square, then trace the mark with a razor knife. Using a circular saw cut on the waste side of the razor cut. That way you won't have any splinters on the door itself.
 
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Old 04-08-16, 03:43 PM
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A true "Masonite brand" door is a solid core door, but I know what Larry means. Its a mfg paper/hardboard product. The ones you are looking at on sale are surely hollow core as he said. Personally I like them. They lopk great with high gloss paint.
 
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Old 04-08-16, 04:11 PM
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These are the ones I was referring to. Right off the floor and painted, they look great, but go modifying them, especially if you have to cut the blocking from the bottom can make them less appealing Masonite 30 in. x 80 in. Textured 6-Panel Hollow Core Primed Composite Interior Door Slab-16474 - The Home Depot
 
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Old 04-08-16, 04:26 PM
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I guess I didn't know those hollow core ones were Masonite brand! I stand corrected! (Even though I'm sitting). Yep, those are nice doors.
 
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Old 04-08-16, 04:41 PM
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Ever cut a slab door to fix and mortised the hinges, latch plates and bored the holes for the knobs before?
Whole lot of work and done wrong it can be a mess.
 
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Old 04-08-16, 04:43 PM
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Joe, I think the OP is planning on door assemblies, and not just slabs. Yeah mortising can run labor costs sky high.
 
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Old 04-08-16, 08:01 PM
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I have natural maple strip flooring, so am looking for doors that match the floor
I have no problem with Masonite doors, but they cannot be stained.
I wouldn't recommend solid pine doors for staining either, it's hard to avoid blotching without a lot of prep work.

I would look at Birch hollow core doors or solid Birch or Maple doors. Solid doors will cost some dollars.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 04:39 AM
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The 'masonite' type doors paint beautifully! IMO they are best for painted doors as wood doors tend to show a crack where the panels meet the styles [?] The way the wood panel doors are constructed allow for movement of the panels caused by temp/humidity changes. That can result in the 'crack' looking unsightly at times. Light colors are worse than darker colors.

That said it's hard to beat a stained or natural finished door be it pine or hardwood! Depending on the color stain used you may need to use a wood conditioner prior to staining.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 08:28 AM
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I had never installed the hollow core Masonite doors until I did a basement reno for my daughter. I installed and painted 4 of them and all of them had to be trimmed. I just cut off what I needed and ripped a new solid piece from a 2X4 to reinstall in the bottom. I once thought that they were cheap and a little cheesy but I changed my mind. They are inexpensive but I also like the 6 panel look without the hassle with changes in humidity with 6 panel wood doors. They look good when painted and they swing easy on the hinges. An added bonus - they were easy to hump down the basement stairs.

I ended up replacing 2 sets of stained luan bypass doors with the Masonite slabs. Much easier to open and close.
 
 

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