building new sidelight


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Old 02-13-17, 08:48 PM
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building new sidelight

I want to replace an old sidelight, which is just a glazing held on a jamb between stops. The rough opening is kind of narrow: 11" W x 81-1/2" H. I want to make a new sidelight with a jamb and a casement for Insulated Glass Unit, with the new jamb the same thickness as the old one - 3/4"; and the casement for an IGU will be 15/16" thick. So:

3/4" x 2 (total jamb thickness) + 15/16" x 2 (total casement thickness) + 7-3/8" (IGU width) = 10-3/4". This is 1/4" narrower than the opening, which is good enough.

My question is: Considering that the side light has to be air and moisture tight, and also structurally sturdy, how do I attach the wood casement to the jamb? Just waterproof glue and stops/molding on both sides and a lot of caulk? Or do a dado joint or just interior rabbet?

Thanks, h.
 

Last edited by harum; 02-13-17 at 09:12 PM.
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Old 02-15-17, 08:37 PM
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I guess I have to reword my question about the sidelight: What are good ways to attach wooden casement to a 3/4" thick wooden jamb so that the assembly is air/moisture-tight?
 
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Old 02-16-17, 03:59 AM
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Once you have the frame that you want, the IGU is put in place with plastic shims and it is siliconed in, or better yet, OSI Quad, then the outside stop is applied. It is basically waterproof at that point. Your entire frame will need to be sealed as well around the perimeter.

I have never seen a 3/4" wide jamb. Most are either 4 9/16" or 6 9/16", depending on the thickness of the wall.
 
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Old 02-16-17, 09:17 AM
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Thank you Chandler!

...the IGU is put in place with plastic shims and it is siliconed in, or better yet, OSI Quad, then the outside stop is applied.
Is the interior rabbet with outside stop combination better in terms of weather-proofing than the grooved stiles and rails? I understand that with outside stops replacing the glass is a simple on-site job. With grooved frame the glass is installed at the time when the frame is glued and assembled and glass replacement is pretty much impossible. Would grooved stiles/rails be collecting moisture in the grooves or not?

I have never seen a 3/4" wide jamb. Most are either 4 9/16" or 6 9/16", depending on the thickness of the wall.
I meant that the jamb is made of 1x (3/4" actually) lumber, this is typical for wood frame houses; yes, the width is 4 9/16". Should I have called it "jamb thickness"?
 
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Old 02-16-17, 09:28 AM
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Yes, 3/4" is the thickness, 4 & 9/16" the width and 81" [or whatever] is the length.
 
 

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