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What is the best tool to taper a threshold and make it thinner?

What is the best tool to taper a threshold and make it thinner?


  #1  
Old 05-09-18, 04:31 PM
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Question What is the best tool to taper a threshold and make it thinner?

Hi all, after finding out that my door's threshold was hand made and therefore its nearly impossible to find a replacement I am going to be making a replacement myself.

I plan on buying pressure treated piece of wood and making it myself. Final dimmension I need are 6ft x 6 inches and 1/2inch thickness. With 1/2 inch tapers on either side.

This is the picture of the piece I am trying to recreate - https://imgur.com/a/As0bPas
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Name:  door 2.jpg
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I envision buying a 72x6x1 (or 72x6x3/4) piece of wood and then shaping it.

I got a circular hand saw. Im thinking I need a hand plane, and a belt sander (or can I get away with hand sanding?)

My two main concerns are:

1) Tapering the edges to about 45 degrees 1/2 inch on each side.

2) Making it thinner, current one is 1/2 inch but maybe over 40 years and because its rotting through it actually was 3/4 originally?

Is hand plane best tool for both of these jobs? Or am I heading totally into wrong direction? While Ive done quite a bit of wood working over the years, I have never used a hand plane before so I am not sure what its capable of.

Please school me

Thanks!
 

Last edited by Chrushev; 05-09-18 at 05:13 PM. Reason: added pics from link
  #2  
Old 05-09-18, 06:59 PM
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First recommendation is to skip the pressure treated wood.

I would highly recommend some type of composite material, or polywood that is stable, workable, and will not rot!
 
  #3  
Old 05-10-18, 05:11 AM
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And I think the best cutting option for beveling the edges would be a table saw, I've done similar on mine. I'm guessing that's not an option. A hand planer will work, but it may be tough getting a uniform edge/surface. Ditto with cutting the bevels with a circular saw, a little tough to do on a narrow piece where you wouldn't be able to use a guide. If it is in fact 1/2" I don't know if the composite stuff comes in that thickness (or PT for that matter), so you would need a surface planer.

If you DO opt for pressure treated, be sure to use a good dust mask.
 
  #4  
Old 05-10-18, 06:11 AM
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Table saw was my first thought also. Would not even try with a hand saw.
 
  #5  
Old 05-10-18, 06:13 AM
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You will not find a 6 inch wide board. A 1x6 is 5 1/2 inches wide. The next widest is a 1x8, which is 7 1/2 inches wide.
 
  #6  
Old 05-10-18, 07:41 AM
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There are custom millwork shops that specialize in this kind of work. "Back in the day" many lumberyards offered at least some custom millwork, but most have been driven out of business by the "big box" stores.
You might also find something ready-made in a good window & door company. Doorwalls typically install with a tall track at the bottom that requires a wide tapered threshold.
 
  #7  
Old 05-10-18, 04:10 PM
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Good catch on the width, Wire; when I see a dimension like that my brain auto-corrects without thinking about it.
 
  #8  
Old 05-11-18, 02:47 AM
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My fix would be the most expensive - an excuse to buy more tools if I didn't have what was needed
 
  #9  
Old 05-11-18, 04:27 AM
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Mark Diddo, Am in process of cleaning up work area and find I (need) many new things.
 
 

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