Converting casement to double hung

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Old 07-31-18, 12:41 PM
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Converting casement to double hung

I'm converting casement windows on 2nd level of home to double hung. The frame is good, so I'm going to get a replacement/pocket window. This works well for me as I can do this from the inside of the home vs 2 stories up on a ladder on outside of home.
Issue is: Since currently I have casement, there is no 'Outside Stop' , so when I place the window into the rough opening, it will not stop (obviously) and fall to ground and shatter into a million pieces...Is there some kind of standard stop material, frame, etc, I can buy to secure into place prior to placing this window in? Or do I make my own?

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Old 07-31-18, 01:15 PM
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You might be able to find wood milled to the size you need or you can rip it down from larger stock to the size needed. Another possibility is to use vinyl to make painting less a chore in the future.
 
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Old 07-31-18, 03:09 PM
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Standard? No... but as mentioned you might want to buy some 5/4 Azek (pvc) and rip it to size. Converting casement to DH is not always straight forward.
 
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Old 07-31-18, 03:40 PM
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Depending on the look your going for something like this ripped in 1/2 may work with the cut side toward the inside.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Veranda-...0000/203640236
Do not get scared by the price, in the store you can buy one piece at a time, not 15.
 
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Old 07-31-18, 04:39 PM
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thanks for the info everyone.
 
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Old 07-31-18, 05:29 PM
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measuring rough opening

My plan is to take out the current casement window and replace with double hung window (pocket window), so no exterior work needs to be done. To figure out what is what with all the wood/trim, etc. on the casement window frame I had to take apart some things (without going so far as to take out the whole window, not ready to do that yet). But I do also need to measure the rough opening for my new window.

1. In picture attached (showing complete window itself), Everything you see in wood (interior window frame, trim, interior stop) that complete unit will come out...correct? (After I detach the outer window itself). I examined the whole interior frame and it looks like this will come out. Around the very edges of entire window (interior) is my rough opening (I think) as it is surrounded by 2x4's which creates the rough opening frame. The window wood frame is somehow attached to this.

2. How is the interior window wooded frame attached to the rough opening (or not)? I can't find and nails or screws around the perimeter, so what it looks like to me is after you get passed the interior wooden frame, there is another piece of wood it sets up against, so it will not move past exterior window frame and fall out. It may be glued to this?

2. In picture attached (showing complete window itself), the red arrow indicates rough opening from left side to right side. Is this arrow measurement correct? (essentially goes from the 2x4 on the left to the 2x4 on the right.

3. The second picture (with red and blue arrows), - Red arrow indicates thickness of interior wooden frame and then it is attached to that other piece of wooden frame (outer stop?), which is then also resting against the white exterior frame. Should I take off the extra wooden outer stop also and go down to the bare exterior white frame? Or leave that in and use it as an outer stop, so when I place my new window in (from the inside of house), it has something to rest against.

see attached pictures
 
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Old 08-01-18, 07:17 AM
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Casement windows can be odd dimensions compared to double-hung. What are your dimensions?

I understood your question to be about STOPping the new window from falling thru the opening as you put it in place. Or are you asking about how to trim the installed window?
 
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Old 08-01-18, 08:06 AM
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1. In my mind that depends on how you are doing your window replacement. You can remove everything down to the rough opening in which case you have a situation more similar to new construction. If you leave the old window framing and just remove the inner sash/window panel I would call that a replacement.

2A. Most new construction windows are installed from the outside. The windows trim is face nailed to the exterior sheeting of the house. Nails or screws are also driven through the sides of the window frame into the rough framing. When removing them I normally run around the perimeter of the window frame with a reciprocating saw to cut all the nails or screws. The nails are usually where you see shims between the window frame and rough framing.

2B. Yes, the rough opening dimension will be from 2x4 to 2x4.

3. I think your understanding of what's what is correct but this is where it gets messy. The wood outside of the window framing is there to trim out and seal any gaps around the window and make it look pretty. Most/som of that is part of a new construction window that is installed from the outside. Then any gaps is concealed with more trim. Since you are working from the inside only you need to get a replacement window that will very closely match the old window size so the exterior trim lines up.

In your case I'd install a new construction window. I'd remove the exterior trim by working from inside and sticking my head & arms out the window opening. With a helper a new construction window can be tilted and passed through the rough opening from the inside. Turned to the correct orientation and then pulled back into the opening. The outer trim of the new window will catch on the outside of the house and you can shim and nail through the sides of the window frame to hold it in place. Then reach through the window to nail the exterior trim to the house. then caulk or trim the exterior as needed, again working from the inside through the window.

If you do it your way with a replacement window you might have to rip down some wood or vinyl to act as a transition or filler between the window frame and existing trim on the exterior. This can work if the replacement window is the proper size or slightly smaller than the old. If it's slightly smaller there will be a step but it's in the correct direction to be caulked and let water run off to the outside.
 
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Old 08-01-18, 11:19 AM
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You said "pocket window". By definition, that means a window that goes inside the existing window frame of an old window. So, the answer to the question about measuring the rough opening is no... that is not the correct place to measure.

You will want to pull off the wood cover that covers your crank. Unscrew the locks that lock the window. Then there should be wood stops around the lock that you can pop off. They are also on the top and opposite side.
 
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Old 08-06-18, 07:37 PM
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ok thanks for the info

I think I answered my own question as I thought about it more and then your response also- If I measure by the 2x4's, it's more of a new construction type scenario. The main reason I think I'm going to try to get a slightly smaller window and use the concept of new constructio (but buy a replacement window) and fit it into the opening is this is on the 2nd story of my house and will be fairly difficult to try and put a new construction window in (for me at least). Plus I wouldn't loose that much viewing area of window doing it this way. If I keep the current frame and insert a pocket window, I will loose at least an inch around the entire perimeter of window/viewing area.
This is just for a bathroom, and actually most of the other windows on 2nd floor have a roof below it, so I could stand on that and be much easier for those when time comes to maybe do the new replacement technique.
 
 

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