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Do I have to use OIL primer to re glaze windows?

Do I have to use OIL primer to re glaze windows?

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Old 08-21-18, 03:03 AM
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Do I have to use OIL primer to re glaze windows?

Am I going to have to break down and use oil primer for re glazing some windows that I have?

I guess it's not ok to use a latex primer?

Do you primer under and then on top of the new glazing once it dries?

I bought a jar of Dap 33 I believe and thought it would be as simple as just putting in the new glazing and then it dried over night. I didn't realize that you have to primer and paint the glazing and use oil primer, etc. I've never painted with oil paints and dread having to clean brushes in terpentine and stuff I guess, but if I have to ....

Forgot to mention that all the windows are covered by storm windows. Don't know if this changes anything, probably not, but thought I'd mention it.


I've never done any of this before.

Thanks
 
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Old 08-21-18, 03:08 AM
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Priming the wood first prevents the wood from sucking any oil out of the glazing giving it a longer life. Oil primer is better but latex primer should be ok. Just make sure it's dried well first. You'd also want to give the glazing extra drying time before you prime it with latex.

Turpentine costs too much and hasn't been used to clean brushes since the 60s. Mineral spirits is used the most but even gasoline will work.
 
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Old 08-21-18, 04:20 AM
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Thanks Marksr! So I can use latex primer great!

Is paint thinner mineral spirits?
 
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Old 08-21-18, 04:31 AM
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Mineral spirits is often called paint thinner. DAP glazing is kind of oily so you'll want thinner [gas or kerosene also work] to clean up your fingers when you are done.
 
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Old 08-21-18, 04:42 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Mineral spirits is often called paint thinner. DAP glazing is kind of oily so you'll want thinner [gas or kerosene also work] to clean up your fingers when you are done.
Thanks!

Hey I just saw that HD has DAP latex based window glazing in a caulk tube. Would that be ok to use instead of the DAP 33? I can return the 33.
 
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Old 08-21-18, 05:02 AM
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SWP has a latex based glazing that I'm partial to - 66 Glazing, mainly because it keeps my fingers cleaner. I've never used a latex DAP glazing. I have used tubes of glazing before and they do ok but I prefer the glazing in a can as I believe I get a better job with it.
 
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Old 08-21-18, 05:51 AM
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I do window and screen repair at my place of work. When glass and glazing is required I will use linseed oil on the surface that the glass and glazing will sit. As Marksr stated that will prevent the wood from drawing out the moisture from the glazing. Painting depends on the type of paint you will use and how long you need to wait before painting. Look at the glazing can for instructions. I will place this sticker on the window when I'm done

"Attn: Customer: For best results, glazing should be painted after it is applied.For latex paint let cure several days For oil paint let cure overnight. "

Some people will apply a thin layer of glazing onto the wood that the glass will lay on. Personally I don't like that idea. It's messy and if and when the window breaks and need repair, it's that much more putty that needs to be removed. And the glass never really sits level on the plane.
 
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Old 08-21-18, 06:04 AM
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I hope to never have to glaze a window again, just one of those things that definitely takes way more time than than you figure, but have done more than a few and my experience has been that latex primer is a definite no but either oil base primer or linseed work equally well. For south and west facing windows, due to the sun and prevailing snow and rain, or if the wood was badly weathered, I would lean toward primer for the added protection. But for windows will a little less hostile exposure and if the wood is in good shape I would probably go with linseed oil.
 
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Old 08-21-18, 06:05 AM
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Boiled linseed oil is great for raw wood and works great under oil based glazing, not sure if it would interfere with latex glazing. The nice thing about linseed oil under oil glazing is you don't really need to wait for it to dry. I don't use linseed oil often because it's prone to mildew here in the southeast so it's not something we keep stocked on the truck.
 
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Old 08-21-18, 06:18 AM
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I hope to never have to glaze a window again, just one of those things that definitely takes way more time than than you figure,
It's amazing what people will bring in for repair. Most of the window glazing I do are for broken garage windows or cabins. But still, the conditions are really bad. Many times the wood is literally rotting away on the muntins and the sash. I usually need to re-enforce the frame with wood filler or hardener. When I see a glass repair come in I immediately assume we lost money even before I start.
 
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Old 08-21-18, 06:33 AM
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I have to laugh at the part about being afraid to use oil paint because of the cleanup.

You will find that if you use oil paint and paint thinner, your brush will probably clean up better and faster than it would with latex paint, water and soap. Latex paint dries on the brush quickly and becomes hard to get off. Oil paints usually dry slower. Paint thinner basically dissolves oil based paint without much effort at all. You just need to do it in a cup, and rinse the brush in clean thinner several times.

Oil paint is also a little more compatable with the glazing which is also usually solvent based, so oIl paints are going to stick better.

Norm... regarding losing money on sash repair and glazing, true that! People would freak out if you charged them what it really cost to do a nice job.
 
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Old 08-21-18, 03:02 PM
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I think I'll try my luck with latex based glazing. These windows are all double sash and are protected by an outer permanent storm window, so I don't know if that changes anything with regards to oil or latex as they are not really exposed to rain and wind.
 
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