Smaller basement window

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Old 08-27-18, 04:01 PM
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Smaller basement window

I currently have four aluminum windows from the 1930's installed in my basement with an actual size of 27w x 14h. To replace these would require custom order windows. Is it possible to making the frame smaller to 25w x 8h by using pressure treated wood? Is this a simple task?
 
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Old 08-27-18, 09:44 PM
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How about glass block inserts?
 
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Old 08-28-18, 05:46 AM
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Yes you c an make the frame smaller, but I like Marq's idea of the glass block.
 
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Old 08-28-18, 09:05 AM
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Based upon a search, I see that in most cases glass blocks are energy efficient. Plus they can be set directly in mortar. Besides Menards, are there any other reputable companies out there that make custom glass block inserts?
 
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Old 08-28-18, 10:36 AM
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I don't quite understand the logic of spending extra time and materials to make an opening smaller when you can buy a custom window that fits the hole exactly and you caulk it in. It may cost $200 instead of $100 but you won't have the added labor and materials of making the hole smaller so it's a wash. And you will be able to open it if needed... and it will let more light in.

Plus when you fill in a masonry opening with a bunch of wood it will likely be drafty. Up to you, but I've done hundreds of basement windows and I wouldn't make it smaller!
 
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Old 08-28-18, 11:17 AM
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I agree you should just fork out a little extra money to get the new windows custom fit. Glass block is tacky anyway in my opinion, and you won't be able to open they up and less light will come through, as mentioned.
 
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Old 08-28-18, 04:46 PM
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Glass block is tacky anyway in my opinion, and you won't be able to open they up and less light will come through, as mentioned.
Have to disagree with you on this point. We're talking about a basement window. Not only do they actually defuse whatever light strikes it and as a result seems brighter. I have galss-block on both the north side and west side of my home. basement and I actually can see well enough without turning on light in the day time. Could not do that with former standard basement windows. And glass block can be had with openings. But the BIG advantage is security. Especially on a basement. Most newer homes are equipped with glass-block for basements. A basement non-glass-block window is perhaps the easiest entry into a home. As for tacky, a basement window that is not glass block looks old, used, and well, tacky.

The majority of window repairs that I do are usually basement windows with plane window glass.
 
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Old 08-28-18, 05:09 PM
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Meh. If yer handy do what you want. It all looks good in the end and it's only a basement window. Opening for ventilation is nice though...
 
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Old 08-29-18, 08:50 AM
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Meh. If yer handy do what you want. It all looks good in the end and it's only a basement window. Opening for ventilation is nice though...
Not to mention egress..........

A standard window just looks "cleaner" in my opinion.
 
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Old 08-29-18, 04:27 PM
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Mossman...
 
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Old 08-29-18, 04:39 PM
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To each their own!

Shower walls and big windows, I agree, but for basement windows it's the cleanest look you can get,

Who ever opens a basement window anyway!

https://www.doityourself.com/forum/a...1&d=1535582381
 
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Old 08-29-18, 04:40 PM
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Not to mention egress..........
If a basement is going to be used as a living area then all bets are off, and there are very specific codes about egress and windows.

But I don't think we are talking living area. I'll stick with my Glass-Block for safety and security and diffusion of light. Not to mention the clean look and no-maintenance. Oops, I said not to mention that.
 

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Old 08-29-18, 04:45 PM
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Gross.
If you do go with glass block most places with fenestration codes will require the window unit to meet minimum NFRC energy standards (Energy Star). Not all glass block units do.
......................
 
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Old 08-29-18, 06:41 PM
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OK this is getting to be a "mine is bigger than yours" type of thing.

But fenestration codes are meant to deal with entry doors and windows for livings area and dwelling sections and commercial buildings. E-glass is the latest form to meet these codes. Almost all door manufacturers (including Larson) make an e-glass full view door.

I don't know if Glass-block meets these codes or not. Does it matter for a basement, ground level window?

What we are speaking about here is a basement window that (most) measures about 32" x 14". And these standard windows do not meet any type of fenestration codes. They are for a basements not meant for living or sleeping. In fact most homes in my area have at most only two basement windows. Located at or below ground level.

I'm not going to argue what looks better or what is better. That's seems to be a personal choice by the comments here.

The OP asked if making it smaller was feasible and possible. Most said it was possible but not feasible. And many of us suggested Glass-Block for ease of replacement, cost and security. Nothing is wrong with plain glass if that is what the OP likes. Obviously there are two schools of thought on this subject.

Just a side note...I suspect some people think installing a Glass-block window is difficult. I can assure you it is not. My first attempt was successful and I had no idea as to what it entailed prior to buying the glass-block (In fact my second install I did was with a ruptured disc that needed surgery that same month) . If you are the least bit handy, it can be done. I think a lot easier than installing a regular window. Just my thoughts.
 
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