Basement Bathroom Ventilation Fan

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Old 01-22-16, 08:00 PM
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Basement Bathroom Ventilation Fan

Hi all,
Putting a bathroom in my basement and need some advice. Installing a vent fan that will be discharging out the side of the house, roughly 5 feet straighshot from the fan. With that short of a straight run, am I ok without insulation if I use pvc and pitch it downward or am I better off using insulated flex vent?
 
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Old 01-22-16, 08:12 PM
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Ps- live in Michigan so gets pretty cold if that makes a difference
 
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Old 01-22-16, 08:31 PM
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How about insulated rigid duct? I don't like to see flexible duct of any kind used. (Says the clown who has ONLY flexible duct in his heating system. )
 
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Old 01-22-16, 08:45 PM
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I'm reluctant to use flex as well from what I've read. Do they make insulated rigid or are you saying use rigid and wrap it in fiberglass?
 
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Old 01-23-16, 01:03 AM
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Is that 5' of duct going to be inside a reasonably warm basement? If so, I would assume any condensation would be minimal and if there is a shower down there a timer to keep the fan running an extra 20 minutes after being switched off to remove excess moisture would also clear the duct of any moisture.

Bud
 
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Old 01-23-16, 12:30 PM
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Hi Bud,
Yes it will be warm. We'll be running a heat duct to it and the rest of the basement is insulated and heated. I'll also have a heater in the fan itself as well as radiant floor heat if that makes a difference. Really appreciate your feedback.
 
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Old 01-23-16, 01:17 PM
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The insulating sleeve from a length of flexible duct can be used to insulate rigid duct. Make sure to keep the ends tight to reduce/prevent air leakage between the duct proper and the insulation. Throughout the run of the duct the insulation must not be crushed against the duct.
 
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Old 01-23-16, 03:25 PM
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P3, with that short of a distance through a heated space, there is not need for insulation. I would recommend a rigid metal duct and if you insulate it, it will reduce the sound a little. But there should be no appreciable condensation until the air exits the vent. Allowing the fan to run after the shower in off will get rid of excess moisture in the bathroom as well as any that might be inside the duct.

Bud
 
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Old 02-01-16, 12:41 PM
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bowen1981

Galvanized duct would be best & might be required to meet code.
 
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