Garage ventilation to manage humidity issue

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  #1  
Old 10-07-19, 10:06 AM
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Garage ventilation to manage humidity issue

We bought a new house and have a garage w/3 concrete walls

We installed a new garage door which sealed everything up to tight and almost immediately had a significant mold issue from the high humidity.

To mediate we installed two vents in the garage door and then a powered roof vent to pull the air flow through which solved the issue.

I didn't notice at the time that the roof vent is on a thermostat switch - if the air temp drops below 60 degrees the fan switches off.

So my question is this - can there be significant humidity, leading to the same sort of issue, even at sub 60 temperature? Should we rewire the roof vent to bypass the temperature switch?
 
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Old 10-07-19, 11:13 AM
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Certainly the warmer the air the more moisture it can hold so as temps drop so does moisture, the question is at what point does the moisture level drop to a point that will not cause any issues.

I suspect it's going to be a trial and error to see what happens without the fan at the lower temps!
 
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Old 10-07-19, 11:24 AM
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Thanks for the response!

Unfortunately we are trying to use the garage for storage and the last time the humidity hit we got lots of mold so maybe the right idea here is to bypass the switch?
 
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Old 10-07-19, 12:43 PM
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You haven't told us where you live. As air exits outside air must enter to replace it. Example, on a rainy day you would be flooding that garage with lots of moisture. Same in other climate regions even when it isn't raining.

Ventilation to lower humidity works well in warm dry climates. Tell us where you are.

Bud
 
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Old 10-07-19, 12:52 PM
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Yes location is very important.

If you are in a cold climate then defeating the temperature switch may cost you a fan motor.
Many motors do not like to run/start when it is cold re: below freezing.
 
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Old 10-08-19, 09:26 AM
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We live in the Oakland, CA area:

https://www.usclimatedata.com/climat...tates/usca2500

So right now with the temperature governor - which dials down to only 60 degrees - it looks like the fan would just be off for most of Jan / Feb

Last year we had lots of rain which set this all into motion.

I forgot to mention the garage leaks pretty good, we're working on a waterproofing solution that doesn't involve exterior trenching (cost prohibitive).
 
  #7  
Old 10-08-19, 10:16 AM
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I would either jumper it or wire in a switch which can basically jumper it but gives you the option in a convenient location.
You are in a warm climate so low temperature should not cause a problem.

The leak is creating additional moisture in the garage that you have to get rid of.
 
 

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