Freezer door feels warm


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Old 01-09-18, 02:20 PM
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Side of freezer compartment feels warm

Freezer and fridge seem to be working well, but I just noticed that the side of the freezer compartment feels warm to the touch on both sides. What could this be? Does it warrant a service call? (Unit is out of warranty.) Thanks.
 
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Old 01-09-18, 02:54 PM
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Hi Ellen, are you sitting down? Now this may or may not be your reason for the warm feeling, but some manufacturers install heaters on the exterior of their refrigerators and freezers to reduce the risk of condensation. First time I ran into that I almost fell over. To make their logic even worse the installed an energy saver switch inside to allow people to turn those heaters off. The irony was turning the switch off turned the heaters on. Turning the switch on (remember it is an energy saver switch) turned the heaters off.

Now, not all mfgs provide a switch but from your description you do have the heaters. Look inside to see if you have a switch but first note whether it is on or off. Whatever position it is in, change it. Some mfgs may have gotten smarter and reversed their reverse logic.

let us know what you find.

Bud
 
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Old 01-09-18, 02:59 PM
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Ha-ha, yes, good thing I was sitting. I don't see Energy Saver switch, and it isn't listed among the bells and whistles. Unit is nearly 20 years old - wonder if they had that brainstorm at the time.
 
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Old 01-09-18, 03:39 PM
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I did a little search to see if I could find a date, no luck. I doubt any "energy star" units (but who knows) would have heaters as all it takes to solve the condensation issue is thicker walls and a bit more insulation.

Now, 20 years is getting back to before some major improvements were introduced in the refrigeration designs. If you look at some new units they should have an energy sticker and indicate an average yearly cost at some reference electricity price. What you don't have is a number as to what your current unit is costing per year but that can be tested. There are plug in power meters that can be rented or sometimes a library or other will loan them. You would need to leave it connected for some period of time but your answer would tell you how much you would save with the new unit. Often the new refrig will pay for itself in a reasonable period of time. Worth considering. 30 years I would say for sure to get the new one but I would test a 20 year old to be sure.

if you have the make and model number we can search a bit to see if there is a switch somewhere or ption to turn that heater off.

Bud
 
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Old 01-09-18, 04:01 PM
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No switch? Then I know what I would do to those heaters: remove their ability to receive power. Hopefully as simple as unplugging them, but a sharp object and a wire nut works just as well.
 
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Old 01-09-18, 04:06 PM
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I actually wasn't as concerned with the electricity cost as with a malfunction. The Maytag rep said it was "abnormal," but when I googled "freezer compartment feels warm" it sounded like SOP. So I wanted to make sure before I paid someone $140 to just look at it!
 
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Old 01-09-18, 04:13 PM
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If it is maintaining the correct temperature inside I wouldn't give it another thought.
 
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Old 01-09-18, 04:35 PM
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Freezer seems to be -20 and fridge seems to be 20 , so both OK. Many, many thanks.
 
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Old 01-09-18, 05:47 PM
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Usually electric heaters are around the door to stop condensation.
Many fridges use the sides of the unit to dissipate condensor heat.
 
 

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